WHEN YOU WANT TO STOP MAKING GAMES...

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I'm sure I'm not the only one that this happens, when you're creating a game and think: Is worth continuing with this?

I know what you gonna say , take a break and come back when you can, but when I return to a game after so long I lose the " inspiration " and I have to start from scratch

Any advice ?

Oh, and sorry for any errors, I'm using google translate
Well, I've been RPG Making for 10+ years, and as you can see I've got no real complete game or even actually decent demos. But I keep on persisting. It is definitely worth continuing, but there is a fine line between losing the interest on the project and getting tired. If you lost interest, it's hopeles... But maybe you're just on a part of making that you really dislike! In such a case, I'd advise you to go do something else and recharge your batteries!
unity
You're magical to me.
12592
Yeah, if it's just burnout, try doing something else for a while and see if the motivation returns.

I've found that making more manageable-sized projects is a huge help. In the past, I worked on a single project on and off for ten whole years. I had made it just too huge for any single person to finish, and after all those years, I looked at it and realized that with all the loose ends, I was maybe about half way done with it. I had to move on.

Now I'm trying to keep things smaller, more manageable, and more structured. I figure if I can make a game in less than two years, that maybe I can keep myself properly motivated. It's working well so far, and entering contests and helping others with projects is doing wonders of keeping the sparks of inspiration alive as well!
Marrend
Guardian of the Description Thread
20932
author=El_WaKa
I'm sure I'm not the only one that this happens, when you're creating a game and think: Is worth continuing with this?


I've had some experience with this. Even now, I pose that very question! I also can't help but to notice that, in both situations, I wanted, or was thinking about, having a "gam-making buddy" to just talk things over with.
Max McGee
with sorrow down past the fence
9219
I would actually advise the opposite of what you're assuming is the conventional wisdom. Force yourself to continue even if it no longer feels fun. If you set a project aside with the intention of returning to it later, if you're anything like me, chances are alarmingly high that later will actually be never.

If you persevere, eventually you will reach a tipping point where it becomes fun again.
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
29589
author=Max McGee
I would actually advise the opposite of what you're assuming is the conventional wisdom. Force yourself to continue even if it no longer feels fun. If you set a project aside with the intention of returning to it later, if you're anything like me, chances are alarmingly high that later will actually be never.

If you persevere, eventually you will reach a tipping point where it becomes fun again.


I agree with this. It's true. Later doesn't come. That said, when I feel the burnout, I'll leave for maybe a day or two and maybe continue writing my book or read something or just watch TV. Do some exercise. Point is, leaving for a day or two and coming back probably isn't going to kill the inspiration, and often refreshes it.
Max McGee
with sorrow down past the fence
9219
It's odd because I really struggle less with the "I don't feel like making games anymore" problem but I struggle a LOT with the "I don't feel like making THIS game anymore, because I've got graphics/idea/in the mood for a new/different one."

I have the worst neophilia of anyone I know. I am totally obsessed with things that feel new, in pretty much all areas of my life.
CashmereCat
Self-proclaimed Puzzle Snob
11638
@Max Its pretty easy to create lots of new projects. I've done that for 3+ years. Except now I've set myself the rule: don't start a new project until you've finished the ones you're working on. And its working! For the most part. I probably still shouldnt be working on 3-4 projects at once, but at least its better than nothing.

As for quitting game Dev altogether, do it if you want. But if you ever feel to come back, pick up on that old project again. I guess what I'm trying to say is - pick something and stick through with it to the end. I find that hard, even away from keyboard, but working on it is a great fantastic thing to do that will benefit you. I know it does me.
Thanks for all the suggestions, what I normally do is do something once a day , even if it's just changing a little event

But yeah, I 'll take 2 or 3 days off and return with the maker
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