HAS ANYONE MADE AN ONLINE SERVICE MADE TO INFORM PARENTS ABOUT WEATHER A GAME IS OK FOR THEIR CHILD A LOT

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Hello! I'm sure most of you notice that games often get a lot of heat because people think that they influence violent actions in a kid. While I don't think this is true, I do know that there are a lot of games that have things in them that should only be explored by somebody of a certain mental maturity. The media is no help with this kind of thing since they always take the worst parts of a game and show them to people who don't know better. Parents don't have time to do research on every game their kid plays and often time gives their kid a game they just aren't ready for. It seems like it would be a good idea for a website or youtube channel to be created by gamers who know about game and can give an explanation so that parents and guardians can decide if the game is right for a kid.
Yeah. There's PEGI for example. And I think America has some variant of this (edit: ESRB of course. The name just slipped my mind). And many countries have their own.
I know those exist but parents usually ignore the rating, then complain about how the game is inappropriate for their child. I suppose if they ignore the ESRB rating, they would ignore that as well.
The ESRB rating is already in place and does the job.
Between looking at a logo and a couple of words or browsing the internet to find and read/watch a review, I think it's safe to assume that a majority of parents would pick the simpler, faster option.

I think that most parents who believe video games are a bad influence on their kids probably forbid them to play at all, don't have a console at home or whatever. I doubt they'll suddenly become interested in knowing more about something they fear and blame. The possibility of being wrong is very threatening to a lot of close-minded people, and several studies (and all of our personal experiences) have proven that video games don't change people for the worse.

So I can see your good intention but that specific idea just wouldn't work.

EDIT: Ninja'd. So yeah, the real problem here is about some parents being ignorant and/or lazy. If they already ignore the ESRB, you can be sure they'll never take the time to search and watch reviews.
Fewer and fewer people do that all the time. It's an old stereotype by now. Most parents with young kids play games themselves in this day and age.
If I ever have kids, I'm going to brainwash them into playing all the games I enjoyed as a kid like kentona does.
author=Housekeeping
If I ever have kids, I'm going to brainwash them into playing all the games I enjoyed as a kid like kentona does.

lucky for me it was an easy sell, because amazing games from 1990 are still pretty amazing in 2015.
CashmereCat
Self-proclaimed Puzzle Snob
11638
Maybe they can have something a lot more in depth like Kids In Mind.com, which specifies the exact content that is inside.

That site is popular, so I wouldn't see why one for games would be a guaranteed failure.
author=kentona
author=Housekeeping
If I ever have kids, I'm going to brainwash them into playing all the games I enjoyed as a kid like kentona does.
lucky for me it was an easy sell, because amazing games from 1990 are still pretty amazing in 2015.


My 5 year is intrigued by Super Mario Bros and Pac-Man from the NES. And there's always the old cartoons we grew up with as well. The 80s and 90s were both great decades.
LockeZ
I'd really like to get rid of LockeZ. His play style is way too unpredictable. He's always like this too. If he ran a country, he'd just kill and imprison people at random until crime stopped.
5958
Kids these days don't want to play video games anyway. It's uncool. That's something dad does.
author=macblo
Hello! I'm sure most of you notice that games often get a lot of heat because people think that they influence violent actions in a kid. While I don't think this is true, I do know that there are a lot of games that have things in them that should only be explored by somebody of a certain mental maturity. The media is no help with this kind of thing since they always take the worst parts of a game and show them to people who don't know better. Parents don't have time to do research on every game their kid plays and often time gives their kid a game they just aren't ready for. It seems like it would be a good idea for a website or youtube channel to be created by gamers who know about game and can give an explanation so that parents and guardians can decide if the game is right for a kid.


I don't believe we should stifle kid's experiences. I do believe however that we can enrich our kid's experiences by not glorifying violence.

Interestingly, there's something that happens why you forbid something. It becomes valuable! As in, if you forbid violent stuff this is the very first thing they will sneak into their house.

Rather, teach them what good culture is. Take them to plays, show them how to enjoy a good rpg, dark or not. Show them anime if you want. Kids will rise to the level you give them. If all they have is kid's crap growing up, they will be deprived (trust me, I spent the last 5-10 years catching up on 80s music, which instead of listening to normally we had... Raffi. Thanks guys, for letting the 1980s slip away from me).
That said, my nephew and nieces grew up playing things like Battlefield, GTA, Medal of Honour... that kind of shit. Their favourite game for the last 3 years? Minecraft.

Just goes to show that kids will find what they like, no matter what. You can try to influence them and sometimes it'll work, depending on what they're shown, but they are really just tiny little people with their own minds and opinions (just lacking the capability to make certain decisions for their lives just yet).

(I mean, my mum was super hard-core protective. I still snuck in X-men and the like, even though she hated the violence in the programs. Too bad Mum. That's the breaks when you have a nerdy kid. ^.^)
Not so much forbidden games, but I had some SNES star wars game that I couldn't wait until Christmas to play. So I tore open the wrapper, played it some, resealed the package. ^_^;

It shouldn't be the rule that you must be 18 to play this game, or you can't buy. Video games are not like drugs. Only that parents should know that it's rated M for violence, profanity, and other stuff that is really just stuff. The parents and kids should have a talk, and it's fine if the game is violent. If they are buying it because it's violent, this means they have violence-seeking behavior, and this is more disturbing than any game they could buy.
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
32378
author=bulmabriefs144
If they are buying it because it's violent, this means they have violence-seeking behavior, and this is more disturbing than any game they could buy.


Yes, this.^^^^

I'd also like to point out that for all of the studies saying that video games make people violent, there are just as many studies showing that violence in video games may calm violent tendencies in people; that it acts as a release.
"New study shows coffee cures hemorrhoids."

I mean, I don't want to be the guy that dumps all over studies, they can be very important. But source, bias, and method are seriously important lest you want to end up like the McCarthy's of the world.
The real problem here is that parents see a letter and don't READ the back or box that says WHY it was rated that way. All they know is that their kid is bothering them for a game their friends have and if their friends have it then it must be okay for them to have as well right? My nephew is and was a dumbass who thought he was some gangster from the ghetto long before he ever played video games, and after learning about video games and tabletop games I caught the little bugger playing a totally nerdy game called "Dungeons and Dragons". You know the kind of game that gangster kids DON'T play. To this day he likes playing it because he likes being a powerful hero who slays demons and monsters and saves people. Still thinks he's a gangster.
BizarreMonkey
I'll never change. "Me" is better than your opinion, dummy!
1625
author=Shinan
Yeah. There's PEGI for example. And I think America has some variant of this (edit: ESRB of course. The name just slipped my mind). And many countries have their own.
ESRB and collectively PEGI are for scruuuubs.

I use T for Tolerant and accurately describe what you're in for. Then you may judge yourself. Kinda avoids the immediate disregarding of content in favor of a big 15+ sticker.

This covers my ass and let's me snidely bypass the need for ESRB or PEGI, typically it's teenagers and adults up to age 32 or so that play my games.

At least if my analytical data on Youtube and Desura are to be believed, I view it from time to time because it makes my balls feel big.

What were we talking about?
The ESRB is probably the best bet for a parent who don't want to take the time to research what the game is about. As the ESRB errs on the side of being overly cautious, it will work for any kid who isn't very mentally unstable. Adding more crap is unlikely to help for following reasons:

1) You should engage yourself with what your kids are doing. The chance of things going seriously wrong increases dramatically if the parents don't pay attention to what their kids are doing and don't at least partially involve themselves. If you just park your child in front of the console/computer while you distance yourself from it as far as possible because of reasons, there is an increased chance something bad will happen to your child. No rating will change that. As such, there is very little help for parents who don't consider themselves having time to pay attention to what their children are doing.

2) There seems to be zero basis behind the ratings anyways. The ratings are based on various criteria, but what are the criteria based on? For example, if a game is rated T it's supposedly suitable for teenagers and not for pre-teens. However, was there ever any research done that showed thirteen years old children can generally handle violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling and/or infrequent use of strong language while say ten years old children can not? I see little point in trying to inform the parents what games are suitable for their children when in reality those who are doing the informing doesn't actually know themselves.

The ESRB should do just fine as something you just throw at the paranoia parents until they are fully replaced by parents who grew up with gaming.
IMDB.com has a Parent's Guide: Content Advisory which would be great to have for games. Basically anyone can contribute "facts" about the media, the rules are stated thus:

"Since the beliefs that parents want to instill in their children can vary greatly, we ask that, instead of adding your personal opinions about what is right or wrong in a film, you use this feature to help parents make informed viewing decisions by describing the facts of relevant scenes in the title for each one of the different categories: Sex and Nudity, Violence and Gore, Profanity, Alcohol/Drugs/Smoking, and Frightening/Intense Scenes."

Then the facts follow. It's quite effective, I think.
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