WINDOWS 7

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NoblemanNick
I'm bringing this world back for you and for me.
1390
Windows 7, (formerly codenamed Blackcomb and later Vienna) is the working name for the next major version of Microsoft Windows as the successor to Windows Vista. Microsoft has announced that it is "scoping Windows 7 development to a three-year timeframe", and that "the specific release date will ultimately be determined by meeting the quality bar." Windows 7 is expected to be released in June 2009. The client versions of Windows 7 will ship in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. Little is known about the feature set, though public presentations from company officials have disseminated information about some features. Leaked information from people to whom Milestone 1 (M1) of Windows 7 was provided also provides some insight into the feature set.

So basically this means that Window Vista was a failiure, I feel bad for the people who Window's Vista, for now I'll stick with XP.

Do you feel that Vista was a failure?
YDS
member of the bull moose party
2351
Pretty ambivalent about it. I just hope Windows 7 is better.
Everything Micro$oft has done in the past three years has been pretty much retarded in some way or another. I am not optimistic.
WIP
I'm not comfortable with any idea that can't be expressed in the form of men's jewelry
11363
There was a screenshot of the new Paint on Digg today. It was very flashy looking.

For the record, I like the way Vista looks. However, it was MADE badly.
7? I just heard it as Windows 2009. Oh well.

I am a Vista user, but not by choice. I've gotten used to it now, but when I first got it was terrible. I took me having it for about a year and a half before I finally got all the drivers and work arounds and programs set up for it to do all the stuff my XP computer did. Also, the horrid security warnings were a nightmare. I haven't seen them lately, though... But seriously.
*run program*
"<program> is trying to run. Have you used this program before, or do you know where it came from?"
-yes-
"You are trying to authorize a program to run. Would you like to continue authorization?"
-yes-
"Program cannot be authorized. Please restart the program under administrator privellages"
-okay (fuckyou)-
*run program as administrator*
"Would you like to run as administrator?"
-yes.-
"<program> is trying to run. Have you used this program before, or do you know where it came from?"
-yes-
"You are trying to authorize a program to run. Would you like to continue authorization?"
-yes-
"This program is not compatible with windows vista at this time"
Options: "Okay."

That was in fact, not okay. And shame on Microsoft for making me click the button that said it was.
I switched to Vista recently because I lost my XP disc and couldn't get my tablet to work in Ubuntu. It's nowhere near as bad as I was afraid it would be, especially after tricking it out with power user tricks.

That said, Windows 2009 doesn't sound like it's going to be a game changer. Basically just the Windows 98 to Vista's Windows 95. I'm looking forward to Midori, but who knows when they'll come out with that. I like the sound of a complete rebuild of Windows from the ground up. But by then, Ubuntu might be a better option, so who knows?
So by the time they fix Vista, they release another OS. It'll probably be just as bad as when Vista came out, hell probably worse since people are still using XP.

Also why are they making a 32-bit version? I'd assume hardware will need new drivers for the new OS and there isn't much point in sticking with 32-bit OSes.
author=GreatRedSpirit link=topic=1975.msg32410#msg32410 date=1221703667
So by the time they fix Vista, they release another OS. It'll probably be just as bad as when Vista came out, hell probably worse since people are still using XP.

Also why are they making a 32-bit version? I'd assume hardware will need new drivers for the new OS and there isn't much point in sticking with 32-bit OSes.
No, the new one uses the same drivers as Vista, it sounds like. Like I said, it's just Windows 98, ten years later.
Huh, I didn't know 95/98 used the same drivers. It's been a long time :(

So when does the Windows ME of Vista come out then? :iiaf:
Max McGee
with sorrow down past the fence
9219
Arrrrgh. I just accepted the horror that is Vista. Fuck them and their changing the OS every fucking year. I won't buy it. I'll just live with my shitty vista.
Vista doesn't suck.

The EXACT same issues happened on Windows XP when it was first released, maybe some of you don't know that or just didn't have computers then. It also isn't Vista's fault that most of your programs aren't working. Vista as an OS is pretty decent. And you can change the annoying features of vista in about 3 clicks.
I'm not pro Vista or anything(I still use XP), but the hate around the OS is ridiculous. As long as you've got a decent computer, it's fine.

Microsoft isn't scrapping Vista, either. This is just going to be(like Shadowtext said) the Windows 98 of it. I think Vista's life span is going to last for a long time, considering XP is still around.
I hate vista. Its very time comsuming to navigate compared to other operating systems, and all the security messages are annoying. I stick with XP.


As for Windows 7 (I thought they were calling it Windows9), if I remember correctly weren't they planning on making it to where the whole thing is more touch screen based? I'm pretty sure that when they first started working on it it was planned for most of the input to be done through a touchscreen monitor.


Edit: Windows 98 was a perfectly respectable operating system.
The security messages can be turned off. I don't turn them off, personally--I didn't use Ubuntu for long, but it taught me about the importance of strict permissions on the administrator account, and I don't consider clicking a button to be any more of a problem than typing "sudo make me a sandwich." I've actually been running without any spyware or virus solution (Yes! on a Windows machine!) for the last couple of months and had no problems so far. Between Google Chrome and the UAC, it's tough for anything to get through, as long as I'm only running programs from places I trust.
Max McGee
with sorrow down past the fence
9219
The EXACT same issues happened on Windows XP when it was first released, maybe some of you don't know that or just didn't have computers then. It also isn't Vista's fault that most of your programs aren't working. Vista as an OS is pretty decent. And you can change the annoying features of vista in about 3 clicks.
I'm not pro Vista or anything(I still use XP), but the hate around the OS is ridiculous. As long as you've got a decent computer, it's fine.

Microsoft isn't scrapping Vista, either. This is just going to be(like Shadowtext said) the Windows 98 of it. I think Vista's life span is going to last for a long time, considering XP is still around.

Yo, I've had one POS computer or another since they were running Windows 95, at least, first off. And secondly...I hated XP when it game out too. I'll admit it, I just hate change.
I liked Windows 98. I was also quite impressed with XP when I got my hands on it - it had pre-built drivers for everything I owned OR the "legacy" drivers worked fine. Plus the NTFS is way better than FAT-32.

XP was the first "mainstream" Microsoft OS to be built off of an WinNT base. It was much more stable. I think I can count the number of times XP has crashed on me using my fingers.

I've put off buying a new PC because of Vista. Might as well wait until Windows 2009
Yeah, 98 was awesome. Unless you count ME, then you're just masochist, and XP was also pretty damn good, as evidenced by all the people who still use it. Even Vista probably won't have that life span (to address an earlier point), due to natural OS selection.
...
Also:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOh6Nh8w6f8
I actually work for Microsoft (subsidiary, but I get info/updates on all "top secret" Microsoft things), so I have some insight as to what they're adding. It's cool, but I think mostly ill-conceived. It's built entirely on Windows Vista's kernel (not a big surprise), but the entire hope/idealism for a MinWin/minimalistic kernel hasn't come to fruition at all.

They're really shooting for a better "user experience," which seems to be the theme. However, it doesn't seem like anyone is listening to any details regarding the entire need for writing a more minimalistic/simple thing. Just more services and other things. I have a feeling they'll at least be addressing some of the issues that were built into Vista, i.e. network throttling, as there have been lots of complains about it, and file-transfers. I really hope they will, otherwise, I might not have a very bright career outlook -- on the plus side, I think Windows/'nix support a lot more simple languages to write in than Mac. The big thing, which I hope is common knowledge and I'm not leaking anything, is that Windows 7 is going to have better voice recognition and alternative input support, as well as touch-screen support.

In my eyes, Windows 7 is either going to be Windows 98 or Windows ME to Vista being Windows 95.

As far as Midori, since ShadowText brought it up, they're still being very strange/indecisive about what they want. At first it was "Hey, let's make this a distributed OS with all of the household machines running off of a mainframe-esque design" (which is stupid -- if everyone's on a thin client in a household and you have one physical machine, how do you handle people with very intensive things, i.e. gaming? You'd need a very fancy "thin" client, which might as well just be a damn normal machine). I tossed my two cents in, along with many other developers, and there's a lot of movement towards making it just "possible" to do something with distributed machines/thin clients. THAT would be smart. Make it easier to build distributed applications/split loads on things. The big thing about Midori is that you can find pretty much all of it in Singularity, Microsoft's "research" OS. So look at the features there -- the Midori kernel is fairly similar -- entirely managed to prevent things from going haywire. For backwards support, you'll probably be running a virtualized instance of something like XP or Vista for backwards compatibility with your applications that aren't native to Midori. But Midori will change everything -- and I think for the better. Very modular, very robust -- they're moving away from the paradigms that were set in stone back when mainframes were the big thing (well, mostly, with exception to that retarded move for thin-clients/single household server). Midori will definitely be to Windows what Mac OS's were to OS X. I think it'll be a real winner -- but that's quite a few years off -- although, I can say, Windows 7 would be built/updated a lot faster if they pulled people away from Midori.

I'm mixed about Win7; Vista isn't too bad -- but I'm really looking forward to Midori.
I think you're underestimating the worth of a server/thin client setup for households. Let's say you've got four family members, who in the traditional model would have two to four computers (we'll say three just for simplicity's sake). Probably they'll have two decent computers (Dells or something) and one custom-built computer the gamer in the family built....so about $800 a piece for the Dells and $1400 for the gamer. Altogether that family has spent $3000 on computers, and one of them doesn't even have one.

So instead imagine they spent $2800 on a bangin' server, and $200 on four thin client laptops--barely any RAM on them at all, no harddrives (they run on an embedded OS), good network cards, but the video and audio cards are crap--all they have to do is put out information that's already been rendered, so they don't have to be fancy. $50 for a notebook seems cheap, but they've already got laptops that can actually do their own work for $200....a laptop with less power than the average cell phone ought to be even cheaper.

A $2800 computer should be able to serve up pretty much the same quality of gaming that a middle-of-the-line fat client could while also letting the family play Solitaire, surf MySpace, or write a letter in Word. It might get choked up if you have multiple gamers in the family, but one also assumes they would need better computers in any case, and the money that would've been spent on the fat client can be spent to upgrade the server.

So what I'm getting at is that I don't see where Midori's thin client/server model is such a raw deal for gamers.
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