DERIVATIVE WORKS IN GAME MAKING

Posts

Pages: 1
Blobofgoo
Legs are a burden. Return to snek.
2751
I like using custom assets. A lot of times assets (especially musical) are attached to a creative commons license. My project will be noncommercial, and I have no problem giving credit to the author creator, but the 3rd qualification, derivative works, is limiting my options.

Question is: Does using a track in a game make that game a derivative work of the music? Does this count as fair use?

Tried researching it and got mixed results. Has anyone else ran into derivative works issues before?
To my understanding, "Non-deriv" in CC licenses means that you cannot modify the assets in question. Let's say that you have a track but you don't like the intro, or it doesn't loop correctly. If you go into an editing software and cut the intro off, or make it loop right, the resulting file is not the same as the one you downloaded; It's a derivative. You can't do that. You have to use the assets as they are, or not use them at all... Alternatively, try to reach out the author and ask them about it. Maybe the can do it for you, or something.
Blobofgoo
Legs are a burden. Return to snek.
2751
Ah. Thanks for the help. I'll try asking the authors for what specific uses they would allow and such.
I have to admit also that I sort of thought that non-derivative means that you can't make a music video for it or use it in any other way as part of a derivative work. (Despite not changing the work itself. You're... changing the "presentation" of the work)

But I haven't looked closer at it. I just tend to ignore the stuff with non-derivative in the license.
Pages: 1