DOES IT MATTER THAT WE USE THE CHRISTIAN CROSS IN OUR GAMES?

Posts

Pages: first prev 12 last
Wow, thanks for the fast and insightful replies, everyone! I've decided to not worry too much about this and keep things as is. However, I do want to note that the reason why my friend brought this up was because a nun in my game mentions several gods, and not just one.

Heck, religion isn't that big of a thing in this little game I'm making anyway. I guess I'm just being a bit nit-picky.



author=Mirak
Use an obscure symbol from any alternate religion.
Like la santa muerte for example. No one has thought about using it.

Maybe not in games, but just about every other TV show with 'Mexicans' in them does it. xD
LockeZ
I'd really like to get rid of LockeZ. His play style is way too unpredictable. He's always like this too. If he ran a country, he'd just kill and imprison people at random until crime stopped.
5958
Is it ok to use archways in your game's buildings if the Roman Empire never existed in your world?

Is it okay to use electricity in your game's technology if Benjamin Franklin never existed in your world?

Is it okay to use the Medusa in your game's enemies if the Greek pantheon never existed in your world?
Vaccaria
You'd think MZ would use a dictionary for switches/variables by now?
4936
author=LockeZ
Is it ok to use archways in your game's buildings if the Roman Empire never existed in your world?

Is it okay to use electricity in your game's technology if Benjamin Franklin never existed in your world?

Is it okay to use the Medusa in your game's enemies if the Greek pantheon never existed in your world?

It is OK. It is a fantasy world. Also, if I see a Christian Cross in a game, it's more symbolic as it used to be.

And South Park: Stick of Truth Jesus summon though
Cap_H
DIGITAL IDENTITY CRISIS
6625
In my current project the religion of your homeland has an iron sword as their symbol. Which is easily simplified as a grey cross. It's more of a pagan Norse inspired church. It uses disc shaped iron amulets too.
I think that a generic fantasy religion which somehow reminds us of christianity should use something else than cross. T or Window for example
Personally it's something I avoid doing. I don't like using direct symbols like that in a game which is supposed to have its own world and lore since it confuses things.

To me it's not the same as just drawing inspiration for historical religious practices, architecture or culture. It'd be like walking around the Mushroom Kingdom and seeing an American flag. It sticks out.
AtiyaTheSeeker
In all fairness, bird shrapnel isn't as deadly as wood shrapnel
5424
Hmph. While the Cross doesn't make much sense in a fantasy world, then tell me: does a pentagram (or even a hexagram in the RTP) for arcane magic, or an ankh for divine magic, also make any sense? Personally, being of a pagan slant myself, I prefer crosses not being used in a non-Earth setting, buuuuut that's just me. Doesn't stop me from putting an Ankh of Pharmacology +7 into my games.

tl;dr It's a matter of preference, IMO.
Ratty524
The 524 is for 524 Stone Crabs
12986
author=Pizza
Personally it's something I avoid doing. I don't like using direct symbols like that in a game which is supposed to have its own world and lore since it confuses things.

To me it's not the same as just drawing inspiration for historical religious practices, architecture or culture. It'd be like walking around the Mushroom Kingdom and seeing an American flag. It sticks out.

This holds true to me. That, and I feel like it matters just as much as anything else you put in a game. You are always sending a political message with these elements and it's something to be aware of.
Dragnfly
Beta testers!? No, this game needs a goddamn exorcist!
1786
This came up in a conversation yesterday where a friend of mine is trying to make a Tabletop RPG setting and he's so far spent nearly a year just de-Earthifying everything. I rose concerns that he'll be de-Earthifying forever and never finish his project.

When I see a cross in a game, unless there's other info to support that it represents Christianity (the Xzr series, which took place during the crusades, for example) I just chalk it up to a general western-esque religion.

If it were a censorship issue then I'd direct you to La Pucelle, a game by Nippon-Ichi. (When Mastif brought it over to the west they removed hundreds of crosses from the game, redrew art and even made at least one scene make very little sense because of it.) but you post the good point of fitting your setting. So ask yourself what NIS' developers might have (but probably didn't) ask themselves when they made La Pucelle:

"Is my religion even remotely Christian-esque?" Theirs was about as much as any other fantasy religion I've seen. They tend to have a good, an evil and some sort of human representative.

If it's just two crosses and you have the ability to edit the tiles then nothing is really stopping you. Well, except the high chance that your new symbol may accidentally be from something else. I meant to do a nation's flag and it ended up looking exactly like the sacrificial mark from Berserk and I'd just forgotten that's what it looked like until the 2016 one started airing.
Hexatona
JESEUS MIMLLION SPOLERS
3702
I like the way DQ games usually do it - instead of having a cross, they usually have a goddess statue. If you are like 100% into a game, and used the tile a bunch already, you could just fudge it up into a new symbol. That would be kinda neat, actually.

Anyway, no - doesn't bother me, people using crosses. Japan had no issues using crosses even when very few people were christian in their country - to them it was just exotic.
I replaced all the Christian iconography in the REFMAP tiles for Ara Fell, which was actually significantly more than I expected. I think this is more paying attention to detail than anything.

There is some merit in wanting to respect religious traditions by avoiding what they consider blasphemous as well, though that's not why I did it.

LockeZ, those first two analogies you gave don't work at all. Electricity would have been discovered by -somebody-. Arches would have been built by somebody. A cross isn't a property of nature waiting to be discovered. I would, however, argue that it's pretty lazy to use a medusa in your game as a random reference to Greek mythology instead of creating your own monster; but if using premade graphics is your only realistic option, I don't think anyone should fret over it too much.

It's a trivial detail either way, if you ask me.
Portraying faith in video games is good for world building but there needs to be some sensitivity if real life religions are used. E,g the depiction of Jesus or Muhammad in a negative light wouldn't probably go down too well. However most games I've played made religion out to be a evil organisation hell bent on world domination so it would be a nice change if they were integrated in the story in a positive way.
Though not a game creator, I'll speak strictly from the perspective of an observer/gamer.

Religious symbolism within video games is all about context. A cross is synonymous to many things, and translates to individuals in a number a ways but universally means a place of sanctuary.

In terms of world creation, it aids in creating the illusion of semblance to ours – having the presence of a religious organization or even a secluded sect of religious practitioners that would mirror, variably, those we see in our own. When presented, it's best to do so in a way that builds the game world narrative in some small way, even if it's not a major component to the overall story.

I'll use Dragon Quest as an example: The games have an established religion and lore that derives its origins from the notion of a 'Goddess', and likewise, their chapels/churches/ministry reflect a simple and to the point belief system – that a central figure helps the people cope with the tribulations of their world. Even the demons at least acknowledge her and mock her, which lends a bit more credibility of how it molds the tone of the game world, making the believing in the 'Goddess' seem more or less natural.

Using a cross to represent an in-game religion, whether it be of your own creation, or inspired by real-life ones, still can borrow the symbolism that it holds in the real world, so long as it doesn't detract from what you're trying to convey with your in-game religion. And, in the grand scheme of the world you're trying to imagine, if the cross does no properly represent the religion you're wanting to make, then there are numerous other symbols to draw inspiration from.

Speaking personally, I've found certain titles use Christian/Judo-Christian imagery well to suit their narrative (Xenogears/Xenosaga), while others simply had it sprinkled in to add context to something within the game (Resonance of Fate comes to mind for some reason). As long as it's not overdone or drawn out to the point of making itself redundant, then it can be a powerful tool to forward a narrative.

Simply put – it's all about context and connectivity to the religion you've created and whether or not it can be a symbol that rightly connects to what your religion represents.

Most of the time I relate it to simply representing a place of worship or a sanctuary. Doesn't really bother me, and could genuinely care less whether a game has them or not.
I've always thought it was a little bit lazy tbh; why not create a new symbol if you go through the effort to construct a new belief system? Plus I always did think it was somewhat tacky to use real-life religious symbols out of context like that (not OMG I'M SO OFFENDED BY YOUR CULTURAL APPROPRIATION!!! levels, but just slightly annoying as a religious person myself). But hey ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
As far as connections between the real world and a game's semiology, culture, etc., my perspectives are thus:
-Any resemblance is coincidental. You have these Japanese chipsets on some alien world where Japan doesn't exist. So what? This game just so happens to have an alien culture where everything looks shockingly similar to the Japanese style and that's just part of this world that I created, so deal with it.
-Some symbolism is conveniently digestible. You have some church with stained-glass windows and some cross on it and the player immediately understands what they're looking at. If you change the style of the building too much and change the cross to some other symbol, then they may not know on first glance that they're looking at a church. If you have a clinic with a caduceus or a red cross, then it's easily identifiable as a clinic, but if your world has some X or T or w/e as its medical / first aid symbol, then the player is just not going to get it. You might as well take advantage of the fact that players know what certain symbols mean, because players sometimes give up on community games pretty early on and don't want to invest tons of time learning a bunch of new mechanics, memorizing a bunch of lore, learning what a bunch of new symbols are, etc.. They want to be able to have instant, innate understanding of all of the games mechanics and only be challenged by the things that are intended to present a challenge.
The cross has been used in various cultures to represent various things. We even have on in our alphabet. I see no reason why you can't use it for your own made up religion in a game - especially since different religions do use it, not just Christianity (I mean, sure it's mostly associated with Christianity, but it's not the only religion to use a cross as a symbol. It doesn't have a TM on crosses.)
I really do not think it matters, nor see anything wrong with it. Usually, most people are focused on the story to really care.
Craze
why would i heal when i could equip a morningstar
15170
this thead keeps being necro'd like jesus
InfectionFiles
the world ends in whatever my makerscore currently is
4622
author=Craze
this thead keeps being necro'd like jesus

and we shall uphold that tradition proudly
Eh, it's still from this year, so it's not that bad.
Pages: first prev 12 last