HAVE YOU PLAYED FINAL FANTASY I? WHY NOT?

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Craze
why would i heal when i could equip a morningstar
15170
Hey all. Why haven't you played FF1?

This might not seem like a GD&D topic, but bear with me. This is actually more aimed at people who've never had an interest in FF1, because I'm curious what detracted them/you from it.

I'm not gonna make any judgment calls about the game in this OP -- I just want to hear if you haven't played FF1, why not? I think it's an interesting question for people like me who make very mechanics-oriented games, since FF1 has a very simple story (although it is told in some creative ways, but maybe we'll get to that later).

If you have played FF1, feel free to share what you liked about it or what you'd improve, but that's not the goal of the topic. I might do that later on in this one, or make a second one later about what I/we felt it did well and why it might be unattractive now.

Talk about any version you want!
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
32378
I made it to the elf village when I finally stopped. You know, we complain about games being too linear, but there is such a thing as not being linear enough. I'm not sure how long I spent on the game total, but I spent most of the time fumbling through, trying to figure out what to do next. Every major scene might as well be the end of the game. You've defeated Garland! Time to begin your quest! What? Am I even given a reason beyond "You're the Light Warriors?" You get the pirate ship, and you have no idea why the hell you're even doing this. I made it to the elf village, I can't remember what I did there, and I literally spent the next two hours wandering around the main map wondering what the fuck I was supposed to do. That gets frustrating when you're used to games that give some sort of direction.
I've never played FF1 - I've perhaps blindly assumed that it wouldn't be very good seeing as I couldn't get into FF3 (actual 3, 6 was awesome) and 1 was older than 3. (note I liked 4, 5 and 6 a lot)
LockeZ
I'd really like to get rid of LockeZ. His play style is way too unpredictable. He's always like this too. If he ran a country, he'd just kill and imprison people at random until crime stopped.
5958
I had a similar experience to Pianotm. Non-linear isn't really the right word - there's generally only one place to go next at any given time, but even when you get there you don't know if it's the right place or not. There's no direction given. However, I pushed through that - unlike Pianotm that didn't make me stop playing the game.

I think my first time through I couldn't actually beat the pirates, because it never occured to me that a game might actually expect me to spend more time grinding levels than pushing forward through the content, so I quit. I might have also had a terrible party that it was impossible to win with, like four thieves or something. Second time through, at least a year later, I got killed to death by Astos in the swamp cave just past the Elf Village, which of course erased a bunch of my progress because FF1 has no save points in dungeons. That's still only like 10% of the way through the game.

I only went back and played it through to the end many years later because the MUD I run is a Squaresoft crossover fangame. I felt like, as a guy who's trying to make things in my game feel nostalgic to old-timey Final Fantasy fans, it would be a serious mistake not to be familiar with all the old NES games. I've still only beaten the Dawn of Souls version and have no desire to try the original or PSX versions again.
Kloe
I lost my arms in a tragic chibi accident
2236
I've not playee it, haven't seen it in shops or anything and never really thought about it honestly. Heck, I've played like an hour of one of the FF Tactic game and about 10 minuetes of this odd DS one, other than that haven't played Final Fantasy.
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
32378
LockeZ
Second time through, at least a year later, I got killed to death by Astos in the swamp cave just past the Elf Village, which of course erased a bunch of my progress because FF1 has no save points in dungeons. That's still only like 10% of the way through the game.


This brings up another problem I had: the copy I had had a bad battery unit. The battery worked, but the slightest thing, even picking up the Nintendo and setting it back down, would erase any progress I had. I did try again when I got a copy of it on mobile a few years back, but I also played FFII and enjoyed it more, so abandoned FFI again and didn't go back to it, even though I always intended to.
I haven't played it. I tried to, but for some reasons older rpgs don't catch my attention. Maybe it's cause i got spoiled with more recents rpg when i was younger (ps1) or maybe i just don't like retro rpgs.

Edit: Retro as in nes and snes
I played the GBA version, Dawn of Souls, many years ago. I don't remember any specifics, but overall, I had a pretty good time with it. I thought FFII was better, though.
Dragnfly
Beta testers!? No, this game needs a goddamn exorcist!
1786
I played it when it was new and couldn't put it down so my testimony won't help you... my cousin's sure will though. He HATED the game. The reason was (or at least I know now) because of the need to grind. Stopping the adventure to walk back and forth to force encounters just to get enough money to stay at an inn and do it all over again royally pissed him off.

The same thing happened when we each played Dragon Warrior (Dragon Quest for all the youngyuns out there), which had MORE grinding. Except he liked it better because you didn't have a customizable party. He really struggled with what was the "best team". Keep in mind that back then you couldn't just hop online and get opinions on that stuff.

Remembering back, I did convince him to play FF2... err... 4. And he really enjoyed it... up until when you fight the wall. That was the common point in the game where people often needed to stop and grind because that boss was brutal.

So in summary, I believe he disliked FF1 because of grinding and being intimidated by party customization.

I think everything about why people might not like it now is just related to its age. Slow slow slow, very basic combat, grinding, uninteresting (by modern standards) dungeons... Pretty standard stuff.
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
32378
Well, the big difference was that grinding was the main part of Dragon Warrior's game mechanic. The whole game was built around grinding. In FF, grinding didn't have that same importance, so when you needed to do it, it was irritating.

EDIT: I still think Dragon Warrior was the better game.
I have played up through the Ice Cave on NES, and finished the PS1 version, which is slightly easier (except for the final boss, who was hugely buffed).

I have not played any version besides those, but my understanding is that the drop in difficulty from Dawn of Souls onwards was much more steep than the slight reworking that the PS1 version got.
Dragnfly
Beta testers!? No, this game needs a goddamn exorcist!
1786
author=pianotm
Well, the big difference was that grinding was the main part of Dragon Warrior's game mechanic. The whole game was built around grinding. In FF, grinding didn't have that same importance, so when you needed to do it, it was irritating.


I pretty much agree with that statement. I had no problem with either but I'll agree that in DW it was more like constantly climbing a steep hill whereas in FF it was like hitting a wall. And that wall (no FF4 pun) was no doubt the biggest reason my cousin dropped it. He didn't even seriously try jRPGs again until the high-fanservice era tempted him in.
I never played it because I never owned a NES. I did not get into gaming until I was about three or four. At that time the N64 was a big thing and I was more into Zelda, the problem was I really sucked at video games.

Honestly, I would play it if I could as now that I am older I have more respect for the old school games and can look past the graphics.
I played the Playstation version after trying the original bored me to bits, and finished it. I don't remember much of it, though - it just didn't stick in the mind that well. I do remember the pirates and the cave with all the giants (hill giants?) as well as the elf town and finding the airship. It just wasn't as great a game, in my book, as the other series. Hell, I liked 2 better (yes, I know, weird).
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
32378
It sounds like we ALL liked II better.
Dragnfly
Beta testers!? No, this game needs a goddamn exorcist!
1786
I've gotta punt the whole early-FF-number-thing out the window here. I'll just stick to the Japanese numbering, though with the exception of about an hour of FF12 I've never played any FF in Japanese.

That said, I've never played FF2 or FF3.
I never played FF I through VI. The only ones I have played were VII, VIII, X, X-2, XII, and XIII.
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
32378
I suggest you give IV, V, and VI a chance. VI is considered to be the best of the series (VII was fantastic, but the only real reason that people think it's the best is because it was basically Playstation's flagship game and a lot of gamers first FF.).
Yeah, VII was my first. I would like to try V and VI. I believe my friend has those games at his house next time I will just tell him to hand over those games haha.
Dragnfly
Beta testers!? No, this game needs a goddamn exorcist!
1786
If anyone has the time and ability I recommend they try FF1, just to see how it all started. Seeing something at the bottom level of basic also helps us to think harder about how to improve on it. For example, just by giving combat classes something to do other than Attack or Item would have gone such a long way, but it's because FF1 didn't do it that future games did.

For the completely unrelated record, FFVI is my fav of the series, I rank it in my top 25 best jRPGs ever and my best 50 videogames of all time.
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