SUMMER MOVIE WAGER

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I think since Solo is also a Disney movie they have sort of held back on promoting it (possibly for too long) so that it wouldn't take away from Infinity War money (because, let's face it, the target audience of Marvel and Star Wars are fairly similar)

I also rewatched the most recent Solo trailer yesterday. I must have missed it somehow earlier, but that trailer is really good!

Also (in case you missed it) Infinity War did mad money this weekend, I mean on opening weekend alone it's probably in the top 5...
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443
author=Shinan
I think since Solo is also a Disney movie they have sort of held back on promoting it (possibly for too long) so that it wouldn't take away from Infinity War money (because, let's face it, the target audience of Marvel and Star Wars are fairly similar)

I also rewatched the most recent Solo trailer yesterday. I must have missed it somehow earlier, but that trailer is really good!

Also (in case you missed it) Infinity War did mad money this weekend, I mean on opening weekend alone it's probably in the top 5...

Actually, it's #1 all time.
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443


get psyched!
author=kory_toombs
Space doesn't have gravity, but it also lacks friction. If you drop something in space from a place that has gravity (like a spaceship) it will fall in that direction contentiously at the same speed forever.

Let's find out if this is so.

https://www.quora.com/Will-an-object-thrown-in-space-accelerate-or-travel-at-a-constant-speed

If force is applied to it, then yes. As in, if it is pushed/thrown.

If it is simply dropped, the action of gravity alone will gradually diminish as it leaves the craft.

If I were to toss a tennis ball out of a space shuttle opening (and somehow not die from rapid loss of oxygen), I can imagine it moving just fast enough to continue until it hits the gravity of an orbit. If I were to dead drop it, it would probably stop in midair.

The fact of the matter is, as these bombers basically relied on gravity without any type of propulsion or other force, they probably would not leave the craft.

A missile system would have been far more practical.

https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/1561/would-it-actually-be-feasible-to-drop-a-nuclear-bomb-from-a-satellite

Of course, you can't simply "drop" the bomb — it would just stay in the same orbit as the satellite. The bomb would need a propulsion system (rocket) to decelerate. But this would certainly be possible.

Pretty much what I said. Those bombs were not launched, they were dropped. Fail.
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443
it's the force. duh.
pianotm
The TM is for TimTam Marauder
20856
Since everyone's being super-technical about gravity, it's "technically" incorrect to call space a zero-gravity environment. There is exactly as much gravity in the deepest reaches of space as there is here. Space is an EQUALIZED-gravity environment. Any object moving in space is actually falling.

In the case of dropping bombs, the bombs would be falling at the same speed as the ship they were dropped from, so they would never exit the bay. They'd simply hold position with the ship. They'd have to be pushed in the direction they need to go in some way. Frankly, this is something that could be easily explained away by saying that the bombers had a launch mechanism that pushed the bombs away from their bays. They would, of course, accelerate towards the nearest gravity well in the direction they're traveling. It's nowhere near as hard as explaining away the fact that Millennium Falcon traveled from Hoth to Bespin in a few weeks, or a few months depending on which theories you subscribe to, without the ability to travel faster than light. It definitely isn't the same degree of bad science as being able to see an entire star system blown up in real time while standing on the surface of a planet in another star system, and you know it was another star system because it still had a sun when it was over, and the entire Hosnian system had been destroyed. Walking, legged tanks operating on snow without slipping all over the place is harder to explain than dropping bombs in equalized gravity.

But all of that is fine. The hardest bad science to explain away is the fact that people walk on the deck plates of spaceships without drifting to the ceiling.
Also it's Star Wars and not Star Trek.
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443
The force did it
Preliminary numbers for this weekend has come. Seems Infinity War is about to drop a bit over 50% on the second weekend so it's in the running for the second biggest second weekend ever (after The Force Awakens).

Now I just want to see how the other upcoming movies are going to do. I mean Deathpool 2 seems so far away.


And I know I should have stuck with my "this is star wars not star trek" but... this... is wrong. It even says so in the answer you are referencing...
author=bulmabriefs144
author=kory_toombs
Space doesn't have gravity, but it also lacks friction. If you drop something in space from a place that has gravity (like a spaceship) it will fall in that direction contentiously at the same speed forever.
Let's find out if this is so.

https://www.quora.com/Will-an-object-thrown-in-space-accelerate-or-travel-at-a-constant-speed

If force is applied to it, then yes. As in, if it is pushed/thrown.

If it is simply dropped, the action of gravity alone will gradually diminish as it leaves the craft.

If I were to toss a tennis ball out of a space shuttle opening (and somehow not die from rapid loss of oxygen), I can imagine it moving just fast enough to continue until it hits the gravity of an orbit. If I were to dead drop it, it would probably stop in midair.

The fact of the matter is, as these bombers basically relied on gravity without any type of propulsion or other force, they probably would not leave the craft.
I think you are talking about the bombs in the first scene. I assume you are anyway. Now these bombs are actually thrown. From the movie we can see that the bomber craft has an internal gravity field of about 1g (as we can see in scenes involving the heroine character and other things falling over). Meaning that the bombs are "thrown" at a speed of 1g (9.8 m/s^2) until they leave the shield or whatever keeps the air breathable and generates gravity inside the craft. So technically the bombs are "thrown", just in the direction of the ship's gravity. Now I don't have the movie on dvd or blu-ray so I haven't gone frame by frame to see if the bombs accelerate AFTER being thrown out of the gravity field, though that acceleration could just be because the targeted ships are pretty big and generate enough gravity on their own :P)

and I don't know why there were this many hide tags in this, there is only one in the text...
kory_toombs
I finally changed my avatar, but that doesn't mean I have a meaningful user title.
12533

I'm stating that a ship can have artificial gravity in certain sections prior to dropping the bombs, so the bombs move in the desired direction. Once they exit the ship they enter a place with no gravity from a place with gravity. The inertia of the bombs still exists and cannot become 0 just because they are entering a place with 0 gravity. The bombs should travel at the same speed in which artificial gravity was applied to them prior to exiting the ship. I know if the ship had no artificial gravity then this would not happen, but simply put the technology here is more advance that what we have today, so it might be possible.
Cap_H
DIGITAL IDENTITY CRISIS
6188
The destroyer had to have an immense gravity, but bombers on their own were a bad design.
Buylt overall I liked how new designs in star wars are less advanced.
author=kentona

This is unrelated to the conversation but that's legitimately a badass Lego Ice Planet pfp
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443
ORANGE TRANSPARENT CHAINSAW
pianotm
The TM is for TimTam Marauder
20856
kory_toombs
I'm stating that a ship can have artificial gravity in certain sections prior to dropping the bombs, so the bombs move in the desired direction.


Considering how gravity works, this is a very complicated idea. Just put cantilevers on the bomb bay doors. Problem solved.
author=pianotm
kory_toombs
I'm stating that a ship can have artificial gravity in certain sections prior to dropping the bombs, so the bombs move in the desired direction.
Considering how gravity works, this is a very complicated idea. Just put cantilevers on the bomb bay doors. Problem solved.

You guys are nerds. You should be discussing Lego Ice Planet, the only sci fi franchise worth conversation here.
(My post somehow duplicated it'self pls delete this one thx)
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443
author=Pancaek
author=pianotm
kory_toombs
I'm stating that a ship can have artificial gravity in certain sections prior to dropping the bombs, so the bombs move in the desired direction.
Considering how gravity works, this is a very complicated idea. Just put cantilevers on the bomb bay doors. Problem solved.
You guys are nerds. You should be discussing Lego Ice Planet, the only sci fi franchise worth conversation here.

There's also Blacktron, M:Tron and Space Police
Cap_H
DIGITAL IDENTITY CRISIS
6188
Space Police 3 is underrated with really good retro designs and quirky aliens.
kentona
only 90s kids will like this admin
20443
LEGO is overdue for a new space themed setpiece. They are drowning themselves in licensed sets, which while kinda cool, completely defeat the general appeal of LEGO. Nexo Knights were a brilliant idea - we need a space themed counterpart! Or just a new wave of Blacktron, M:Tron, Ice Planet and Space Police.
I miss plain ol' Castle Lego. I used to have so much fun with it as a kid.
These days, everything comes as a pre-established set with specialty parts and can pretty much only be built a certain way. The creativity is all but removed.