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The world once existed in a state of relative harmony, allocated to various elemental gods, each working to prevent the world from falling into complete disarray. However, a group of mad Gods claimed a portion of the realm for themselves, thus dividing the world into two - the Balanced World and the Chaos World. The land they conquered now resides in the Chaos World, leaving behind only a sea of fog in the Balanced World.

Four warriors have been sent to the Chaos World to reclaim this land from the nine treacherous gods and their dark Queen, and you control their destiny.

Choose from two genders, eight races, and sixteen classes, as well as a large number of weapon, armor and magic types. Each character is completely customizable and the possibilities are endless. Adventure through a large, complex, and interconnected open world, and beware - danger lurks around every corner of this strange and fantastic realm.

Memories From A Dream takes place in the same universe of my previous game, Exile’s Journey, but is not a direct sequel. Although I recommend you check it out, playing Exile’s Journey is not required to enjoy Memories From A Dream.


⚔️Two genders, eight races, and sixteen classes to choose from when designing your four party members.
⚔️Your character’s sprite reflects the armor you wear at all times.
⚔️First person, conditional turn-based battle system.
⚔️Allocate your stats upon leveling up however you please for each character.
⚔️Over ten hours of gameplay with an emphasis on replayability.
⚔️Weapon and armor upgrade system.
⚔️Weapon and armor elemental infusion system.
⚔️175+ learnable skills.
⚔️Skill equip system. Carefully plan the skills you take with you into battle. ⚔️Acquire more skill slots by finding Memory Fragments.
⚔️Mystical, brooding atmosphere, and mysterious lore.
⚔️Freedom of choice/open-world gameplay, similar to Act II of Exile’s Journey.
⚔️Beat the game to unlock new game plus and hidden classes!

Latest Blog

Difficulty Modes

There are four difficulty modes planned for Memories From a Dream - Easy Mode, Normal Mode, Hard Mode, and a unique unlockable mode called Gacha Mode. These modes change various aspects of the game and are intended to increase replayability. The features shown below are subject to change.

Easy Mode
This mode is for those who do not wish to endure a challenge and simply want to experience the game without any trouble.

  • You receive 5 SP upon leveling up. SP, or stat points, is used to upgrade your stats. (Normally, you receive 3 SP.)

  • At save points, you can choose whether you want killed enemies to respawn. (Normally, they respawn automatically when you reach a save point.)

  • You begin the game with more gold and items.


Normal Mode
This mode is recommended for first playthroughs.

Hard Mode
This mode is available immediately and is recommended for second playthroughs and to fans of the “Soulsborne” series by From Software (Demon’s Souls, Dark Souls, Bloodborne). In this mode:

  • Items must be distributed amongst party members before being used in battle. Party members can only use items they are holding in battle.

  • Saving anywhere is disabled. Instead, the game autosaves constantly. When you die, you lose your gold and unspent soul and skill points. By heading back to where you died, you can retrieve your lost resources. However, if you die again before retrieving them, they are lost forever.

  • Party members stay unconscious after battles (normally, they are resurrected with 1 HP after the battle ends).

  • You only receive 2 SP (stat points) upon leveling up, as opposed to 3 SP in normal mode.


Gacha Mode
Gacha Mode is unlocked after beating the game at least once. In this mode, you cannot buy items, weapons, or armor, nor can you find them in treasure chests or on the field.

Instead, you must spend Gold on “booster packs”, of which there are three types: Medicine Packs, Equipment Packs, and Upgrade Packs. Each pack contains eight items - six Common items, one guaranteed Uncommon or higher item, and another item which can be anything from a Common to a Legendary item.

Each item in the game is labeled according to a rarity scale: Common, Uncommon, Rare, and Legendary.

Medicine Packs are the most affordable booster pack, and contain various healing items as well as stat upgrade items. Equipment Packs contain weapons, armor, and accessories. Upgrade Packs are the most expensive booster pack and contain both Azurite and Elemental Orbs, which are used to upgrade your party’s equipment.

Treasure chests, which normally contain items, instead house gold when this mode is selected.

The excitement of this mode comes from its randomness. Will you receive an ultra powerful weapon early on, or will you need to scrape by for a while with a bunch of junk? Because of this mode’s random nature, every playthrough will be widely different.

When selecting this mode, the player is presented with an option of randomizing the race, gender and class of your party members, but this is optional.

Other than the changes detailed above, Gacha Mode is balanced like Normal Mode.

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I would like to ask one question about the "emphasis on replayability". Since I prefer "play value" over "replay value", I usually don't play through a game multiple times. What I would like to know: Is the "emphasis on replayability" limited to class choices and such elements? Then I would certainly give your new game a chance, all the more so since I enjoyed Exile's Journey. Or is the "emphasis on replayability" also related to story, quests and so on? That, unfortunately, wouldn't be my cup of tea then.

Furthermore, it would appeal to many players if stats distribution could be reversed and repeated in case the player, for example, chose a subpar character build (and a player usually can't determine during the first playthrough which stats will be the most important ones). I'm saying this now because I know that most games that offer free stats distribution don't offer do-over options, and because most players that don't like free stats distribution will be "scared away" if there's no do-over option.
author=Spermidine
I would like to ask one question about the "emphasis on replayability". Since I prefer "play value" over "replay value", I usually don't play through a game multiple times. What I would like to know: Is the "emphasis on replayability" limited to class choices and such elements? Then I would certainly give your new game a chance, all the more so since I enjoyed Exile's Journey. Or is the "emphasis on replayability" also related to story, quests and so on? That, unfortunately, wouldn't be my cup of tea then.

Furthermore, it would appeal to many players if stats distribution could be reversed and repeated in case the player, for example, chose a subpar character build (and a player usually can't determine during the first playthrough which stats will be the most important ones). I'm saying this now because I know that most games that offer free stats distribution don't offer do-over options, and because most players that don't like free stats distribution will be "scared away" if there's no do-over option.

I believe that the replayability factor will result from there being 16 classes to choose from, so some players may choose to play multiple times in order to try out new classes. In addition, I plan on including multiple difficulty setting options, as well as Steam achievements, and a few other features that will encourage multiple playthroughs. There are a lot of people who like to do challenge runs in games like Final Fantasy 1 or Dark Souls by limiting themselves somehow, like using only White Mages or attempting to play the game without upgrading weapons or stats, and I want to accomodate players like that as well.

However, you will by no means be required to play through the game more than once to experience everything. Every quest and story segment will be available in your first playthrough. The only thing you will not be able to do on your first time is use an unlockable class that I plan to include. If you decide you want to move on after playing the game once, that is totally fine, and you won't miss much of anything.

There is an option to reverse stat distribution. However, it costs money (in-game money, obviously). The reason for this is that it's too easy to break the game otherwise. If you could freely adjust your stats to cater to particular fights, that kind of defeats the purpose of building your characters, at least in my mind.

For example, if a player could re-distribute your stats for free, and were to come up against a boss that doesn't use magic, they can re-distribute all of their magic stats to boost their attack and defense to absurdly high levels and trivialize the fight. I do want players to have a lot of freedom, but not THAT much freedom. To me, at that point, it removes a lot of the role-playing aspect. A white mage shouldn't be able to suddenly transform him or herself into the Incredible Hulk, you know what I mean?

I do understand your concern, but I don't think it will be too much of a problem. the stats in this game are not complicated, and there are only five (Attack, Defense, Magic Offense, Magic Defense, Speed). I believe that most players will know which stats they should focus on the most for each character, and I'd say these stats are all equally important (agility is not going to be the most important stat anymore like in Exile's Journey).

I also just want to clarify one thing: Your initial stats depend on which class and race you choose. You don't choose your stats initially. Afterward, upon leveling up you gain skill points which you can then use to upgrade whatever stats you want. :-)
Thanks for the detailed answer that many players will most likely find very helpful.

I get what you're saying about the stats redistribution, and I hadn't in mind that players could just "cheat adjust" their way through boss fights. It was more along the lines of "there might be one super powerful optional boss against whom I need the most points invested in a certain stat, and I'm screwed if I didn't know and do that from the beginning".

Well, I'll wait for the Steam release and then decide what to do. There aren't that many new and good commercial RPG Maker JRPGs nowadays, so I might as well step out of my comfort zone a bit.
Stat adjustment can be a lot of fun. Look at Ragnarok Online. Some private servers let you adjust your stats whenever you want. Certain powerful enemies require a certain stat allocation to beat, which requires you to plan ahead and micromanage your character. It makes the leveling process a lot of fun, especially if you can find a new efficient way to proceed. Of course, that's a grindy MMO and not a fast-paced indie RPG, but the core is the same: character flexibility can work wonders in a nonlinear game if the combat is rewarding.
Seems cool, how long is the play time give or take?
author=awakenedfaith182
Seems cool, how long is the play time give or take?


I'm expecting this one to be 10 - 15 hours.
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