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Game Mechanics Part 14

  • LMPGames
  • 07/21/2023 04:34 PM
  • 386 views
Game Mechanics Part 14


It’s that time once more, more game mechanics ready for delivery. This week we’re discussing item crafting and three magic systems; adding in one more because it will soften the “what the hell?” aspect of the second magic system we will be talking about.

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Why make it when you can buy it?
Item crafting is one of those systems that everyone and their aunt throw into their games. Popularized by Minecraft and added in, in half-assed ways a lot of the time, to games. There are some games that use this mechanic well though. Some examples are No Man’s Sky, Space Engineer, and Trinity Trigger.

Out of those three, what you’re going to find in Emilar is going to be closer to Trinity Trigger. In that game, the crafting system is used to give you a way to get things for a much lower cost but requires you to spend the time to get the materials to craft the items.

Items then are set are a higher cost, thereby making crafting, and the time spent to get the materials, worthwhile because money is a bit harder to come by than usual in an RPG.

In Legend of Emilar, this is a focus point for the crafting system. Purchasing items will be more expensive than crafting them, but crafting will take a bit longer due to collecting the needed materials. There will also be a secondary focus that channels No Man’s Sky crafting system more as you get into more powerful items with a chain of crafting needed to make the various components needed for a more complex item.


How does crafting work?
In Emilar, crafting works much the same as in other games with this system; each craftable item has components that make it up. Collect these component materials, pay a bit of money, and Bob’s your uncle you have yourself an item.

Or you can craft them yourself, for free. There are some additional considerations, though. First off, the number of materials needed will be determined by your skill at crafting. Crafting skill is tracked per character and can be improved over time by crafting items or by finding books to train your crafting skill (we’ll talk about this system next week).

So the higher a character’s skill in Crafting, the more efficient they are at making things thus the fewer items needed.

Your crafting skill level is not accounted for when having an NPC craft the items, but each crafting NPC will have a different item and gold cost determined by their own skill at crafting. So, a higher-level crafting NPC may require less items to make something and also have a slightly higher cost.

Another way to reduce the cost of crafting is by finding or crafting the components needed. If you have a component in your inventory, the NPC won’t need to craft it which reduces the cost. This will make more sense in the crafting cost section.

Note that if you do not have all the base materials required for each component item of something you are trying to craft, you won’t be able to craft it. If you have all the base materials needed, you can still craft the item. I will talk about how this works in the Base Material Crafting section.


The Material Map
The material map is a way to visualize what materials are needed to craft an item. The map is built into a leveled structure where each crafted item represents a level of crafting. This crafting level then is broken down into another level which contains a list of items needed to craft that item and so on.

This needs a visual example to be fully understood, I think. So, consider the following material map for a Small Health Potion.



There is a lot here to take in. First, note that there are several items listed here: Glass Vial, Water, Powdered Acacia Berry, and Extract of Helmsleaf.

Of these, all of them except for Water have things listed under them. These are crafting components, or items that are crafted from other items.

Water is a base material; you don’t need to craft it.

Depending on the number of components within a crafting map, the cost for an NPC to craft that item goes up and so the time it takes for you to craft it yourself does as well.

Let’s say you wanted to craft a Small Health Potion. Your character’s crafting level is 1. At level 1, you can craft a level 1 item without any trouble. A crafting level is a reference to how many crafting levels that item has.

The Small Health Potion is a level 2 crafting item; it is crafted from level 1 crafting items.

Extract of Helmsleaf is a level 1 crafting item; it is crafted from base crafting materials.

This means that when you go to craft the Small Health Potion, you may notice that you need additional component items because the potion’s crafting level is higher than your crafting skill level.

So while normally to craft a Small Health Potion you need 1 Glass Vial, 1 unit of Water, 2 Powdered Acacia Berry, and 1 Extract of Helmsleaf; for your crafting level 1 character you’ll need double the amount of water and Powdered Acacia Berry.

Only certain crafting components will be affected by your crafting level and those will be configured per item. The number of items you will need is increased by the original amount required for each additional level over your character’s skill level. So, if an item takes 2 Small Health Potions to craft and is a level 5 crafting item while your character’s crafting skill is level 3, you will need 6 Small Health Potions.

If you are crafting those component potions, well you can see how that adds up quickly. There are workarounds!

The first one is having a character with a higher crafting level do the crafting. Second, upgrade your character’s crafting level. Third, craft up to the crafting level your character is capable of, then take those components to a crafting NPC and have the NPC finish crafting your target item.


Base Material Crafting
A quality-of-life feature being built into this system is the ability to craft an item without having all of the crafting components needed, but where you have all of the base materials required. Let’s do an example using our Small Health Potion.

In your average crafting system, to craft your potion you would need the Glass Vial, the Water, the Powdered Acacia Berry, and the Extract of Helmsleaf. If you don’t have one of these items, you will not be allowed to craft the item.

I find this restriction unacceptable and illogical; I would go as far to say that this restriction is bad game design. As such I am implementing a feature that I call Base Material Crafting.

This feature allows you to craft an item if you have all the base materials required for each component, at each level, of the material map. Looking at our Small Health Potion, the base material list for this item is:
  • Fine Sand x4
  • Borax x1
  • Water x2
  • Acacia Berry x4
  • Helmsleaf x3


If you have all these items in your inventory, you can craft the Small Health Potion. NPC crafters will allow this as well.

Why should you have to craft the berries into the Powdered Acacia Berry and then must craft those with the other stuff into the potion? It’s wasted clicks and sloppy, lazy game design. If you have what you need, you should be able to craft it.


Crafting Costs
When crafting an item yourself, there is no cost to you other than the time it takes to get the materials you need. When you have an NPC craft something for you though, you will have to pay them some gold for their services.

There is no fixed cost for crafting and what you will pay depends on the rate the NPC charges and what you give to the NPC to craft. Let’s look at the Small Health Potion example again; this time I will include the cost information that I left off of the material map above.



Let’s go through this piece by piece. First, at the top, you can see the total cost to you to craft the item. 83G in this case. The number directly after that is the service fee from that NPC; this NPC charges 10% of the total crafting cost. This fee is always rounded up. The 25G after that is 10% cost of the market value of the item you are crafting.

The lore reason for this 10% cost is that if you have all the component materials for an item, you could have the NPC craft it for essentially free, so they add in 10% of the market value of the item you are crafting.

So how do we come to the 83 number in the first place? Via the cost of the base materials used. As you look through the material tree, you will notice that each level is a sub-total of the components or materials used to make that component item. Glass Vial is 45G because it requires 4 Fine Sand and 1 Borax, the costs associated with these base materials is the cost to craft them into the component item.

Remember when I said above that one method of cost reduction when using an NPC to craft an item was to have found or made the crafting components yourself? Here is how that works. So normally, for this NPC you are using, the cost for a Small Health Potion cost is 83G, but what if we already have a Glass Vial?



Since the NPC doesn’t need to craft the vial, there is no cost associated with that component, dropping your cost to craft by 45G down to 67G total instead of 117G. You might now be wondering what the cost would be if we had all the component items.

In this case, it would be 31G; 5G for the Water, 1G for the service fee, and the 25G market value fee. A fair bit better than the 250G market value for a Small Health Potion (this may not be the final cost to buy a SHP in the game, I just used this value as an example).

When we start getting into more complex items with higher crafting levels, you can see how using this method of crafting can be useful to reduce your costs further while allowing you to reduce the grind as much as possible.

To recap, there are three methods for crafting items:

You can craft the items yourself from the base materials all the way up the material tree until you can craft your target item. This way is free, however it can take more time depending on the character you are using to do the crafting, due to their crafting level not being sufficient.

You can have an NPC craft your item from the needed base materials, though this will cost you some gold. The cost is broken down into the NPC’s service fee, the cost to craft the base materials and component materials into the target crafting item, and a fee based on the market value of the target item. The service fee can change depending on the skill of the NPC, but usually a higher crafting level also means that you need fewer base materials or component items.

Or you can combine the two. This method takes more though, but it minimizes your material and component usage, your item grinding time, and your crafting cost with an NPC. You craft up to your highest crafting level and then, if more crafting it needed, go to an NPC to finish crafting your target item. This reduces your crafting costs at the NPC, reduces item waste from your crafting process, and, due to that waste reduction, allows you to spend less time hunting down items.


Crafting Bonuses
This is a sub-feature I am debating adding into the crafting system. This would apply to NPCs and high crafting level characters. It would work like this:

When crafting an item, additional bonuses might be added to it. For example, you craft a sword, and that sword has an additional 10% attack damage bonus because of how skilled your character is at crafting.

Bonuses would be dependent on the item type. A weapon would not give you increased defense, armor would not increase your attack power, etc. I feel that this is needed because there should be further incentive and rewards for getting your crafting level to a high value or from using a highly skilled crafting NPC.


Crafting Skill Exp
As mentioned above, there will be a skill for crafting tied to your character. As you craft things, you will gain experience from them. The amount of experience is dependent on the item’s crafting level. Right now, I am considering using a flat scale, but I do see the merits of having rare items within a crafting level giving more experience points.

For now, though, here is what I have:
Level 1 Items – 50 exp
Level 2 Items – 125 exp
Level 3 Items – 160 exp
Level 4 Items – 200 exp
Level 5 Items – 275 exp
Level 6 Items – 350 exp
Level 7+ Items – 450 exp

Again, an item’s crafting level is related to the number of stages of crafting needed to craft the target item. So a crafting level 7 item has components that are comprised of 7 levels of crafting, meaning their material map is massive.

A way to visualize this is:
Base Materials -> Level 1 Components -> Level 2 Components -> Level 3 Components -> Level 4 Components -> Level 5 Components -> Level 6 Components -> Level 7 Components -> Target Item

The Small Health Potion we have been using as an example is a Crafting Level 2 item. It has Crafting Level 1 components that are used to craft it and those Crafting Level 1 components are crafted from base materials. So the Level 7 item can require a massive amount of items to craft if you don’t have a specific component needed.


Special Items
By far the most complex crafting you will do in Emilar is to create special items. These are items that will require hard to find materials or take a lot of crafting to make them. They won’t be craftable at an NPC and will require you to reach a certain crafting level to make them. This class of items will be used within the item crafting and magic upgrade systems to improve the things you make.

An example would be the Amplifier α. This item can be used as a catalyst when upgrading magic to improve a spell’s attack damage. The Magic Upgrade system is something we will be talking about soon.


Crafting Catalysts
A catalyst is an item that can be used during crafting to impart some kind of effect onto the item being crafted. The types of effects that you can add will depend on the item type, similar to the item bonus system.

Catalysts cannot be bought or made by NPCs. You can find them in chests, get them as quest rewards, or craft them yourself. While most catalysts won’t be too difficult to craft, the materials they require may be hard to find. This is especially true when dealing with powerful effects like increasing exp or high-level bonuses to stats.

To use catalysts in crafting, you will need to be at least level 5 in crafting or use an NPC that is level 3 or higher.


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Hitting the magic books
The Legend of Emilar will feature a unique magic learning system. Instead of unlocking spells as your class level’s up, you will need to visit an NPC to be trained on your new spells to unlock them. In addition, there will be primary and secondary magic schools which you will unlock.

The system works like this. As a mage or cleric class, you get to pick the types of magic you excel in. These are your magic schools; schools in the context of the game are elements. So, Fire is a school of magic. Within each school, magic is broken down into trees and each tree contains the spells that you learn.

This structuring of magic simulates older systems from games like Final Fantasy where you have Fire – Fira – Firaga. In Emilar, these spells are grouped within a tree together to signify that they are inter-related.

These trees can also unlock other trees which branch off at certain points.

For example, with in the Ard (Fire) tree you have the following spells:
Estol Ard
Baes Ard
Bast Ard
Sol Ard
Sola Ard
Scran Ard
Tsvar Ard

This is the primaris tree, or base elemental tree, for the Fire School. “Primaris” is a term from the game. There will be other trees unlocked by learning certain spells from this tree. For example, the Fireball tree unlocks when you learn Bast Ard. The Flare tree unlocks with Sola Ard.

To learn spells within a tree, you just need to meet the level requirement and have the proper amount of gold.


Primary and Secondary Schools
Each mage or cleric class will have a set number of primary and secondary schools of magic that they can learn. These increase as you unlock more advanced classes and allow you to organically build out your magic over time.

A Primary School is a magic school that your character excels in. They can learn every spell within the trees of these schools.

A Secondary School is a magic school that your character can learn spells from but cannot master. Therefore, your character cannot learn every spell and some of the level requirements for spells are higher.

This allows you a large degree of freedom in how you want to build your magic abilities. You can have a cleric that knows attack magic or a mage that masters in healing spells, or you can do both. How you build your magic repertoire is entirely up to you.


Carryover between class trees
One of the harder features to figure out was how would your magic selections carry over between classes and trees. I have gone back and forth on this one many times; even decided to remove the feature all together more than once, but I think I have settled on a happy medium between all of the ideas I had for how this would work that does work.

So, this feature works by stating that the spells you know are not tied to your classes. They are tied to your character. With each new higher mage/cleric class unlocked, you gain access to more Primary and Secondary slots, allowing you to add new schools. In this way, as you change your class either upward or back downward, your selected magic does not change.

The reason this has to be tied to your character is that if it was tied to each class, you would lose access to things you had learned while using a higher-level class. A Wizard has more school slots available to it than a Mage, going from a Wizard back down to a Mage would mean losing those extra slots and the stuff you had learned.

By making it tied to your character, you retain everything. It also makes your choices more impactful; you don’t get to build out a mage/cleric class in isolation. Your choices will stick with you for the rest of the game.

If you change to a non-magic using class, your choices are still there, you just won’t be able to use them as your current class is not a magic using class.


Interactions with Compound and Grand Classes
One place this mechanic is going to cause some trouble is dealing with certain Compound classes. I threw Grand classes in the section title, but I can’t think of anything that has the same exposure that Compound classes do; at least for now. It is a possibility though that there will be some kind of cross-interaction at some point.

What am I going on about? Well, mainly Compound classes between a non-magic class and a magic using class. Since you can build your magic anyway you see fit, dealing with what skills and spells are unlocked in the Compound classes will be harder.

Namely, I can’t rely on you knowing any one particular elemental school, so I need to create spells for every school in Compound classes that mix a non-magic and magic class. Let’s look at the Lancer tree for a moment. Lancer Compound classes get magic jump abilities when mixed with a magic using class.

I will need to create jump skills based on every type of magic because I won’t know what you will have picked throughout the game until that point. I am going to have to figure out a way to handle this within the system. So, in the case of a Lancer/Mage you will have to learn some of your skills through the school system as well as have skills that unlock based on your level using the built-in RPG Maker mechanic.
Example time.

Let’s say you are a Legionnaire, a Lancer/Mage Compound Class. You have unlocked the Fire school. You are going to have skills you learn from leveling and skills you learn through the Magic School system:

Skills Learned via Level:
Jump/High Jump – level 1 (you learn these in the Lancer tree, so they are automatically unlocked)

Primaris Jump – Level 10 (this is the first jump ability that can be used with magic; you have to unlock this to learn any magic jump abilities).

Primaris High Jump – Level 25

Primaris Ultra Jump – Level 50

Here you can see three magic jump abilities from the Legionnaire skill tree. These unlock at level 10, 25, and 50. Once you unlock the Primaris Jump, you will be able to learn skills from magic jump trees that are connected to the Primaris skill trees for your Primary schools. Yep, you can only use your Primary schools when mixing with other skills like this.

Here is what the Primaris trees for Fire jump skills might look like:
Bast Ard -> Fiery Dive α -> Fiery Dive β -> Fiery Dive γ
Sola Ard -> Searing Drive α -> Searing Drive β -> Searing Drive γ
Tsvar Ard -> Hell Dive α -> Hell Dive β -> Hell Dive γ

To unlock the Fiery Dive tree, you will have to know Bast Ard and have learned Primaris Jump. This will make the Fiery Dive tree available for you to learn within the Magic Schools mechanic. Same goes for the other jump trees listed above.

This means the unlock requirements for Fiery Dive α would be:
Level 10
Bast Ard
Primaris Jump

You might be wondering; well, how should I manage all these abilities? It sounds like I am going to learn dozens of skills.

We will cover that in the next mechanic, but I also want to talk about how these Primaris Jump skills work as well. We will be talking about this other mechanic later, so I am not going to go into too much detail here.

So, while other jump skills are skills in and of themselves the Primaris jump skills are a classification of jump abilities. The Primaris Jump, for example, is not a jump skill on its own; it must be paired with magic to be used. This means that if you unlock this skill, but don’t have any jump abilities for it unlocked in your magic school trees, you won’t be able to use this skill.

Emilar will have a game mechanic that allows me to combine certain skills and magic together into a sub-menu. So, when you go to pick a fire spell to use, you will see “Ard” in your skill selection window. Selecting this will open a sub window with all the fire magic you have learned.

This way your selection window remains clean, and you are not scrolling through dozens of options looking for the specific one you want. In the same way, the Primaris Jump is just a selection that opens a sub window. Within that window, any magic jump abilities you have learned from any of the Primaris trees in your Primary magic schools will be listed.

So, you will see Fiery Dive and Mirage Dive if you have Fire and Wind as Primary schools and have unlocked those Dive skills. You’ll then select the one you want to use.

This is another one of my quality-of-life features, I can’t tell you how many games I have played where near the end of the game your item or ability lists are so massive that trying to find the right skill or item to use is really hard and in some cases has gotten me killed because enemies can attack you while you are in a menu.


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Choose wisely…
Yes, that is a Last Crusade reference. So, what could this one possibly be? An interesting, and probably controversial, mechanic is what it is. I recently played Final Fantasy I for the first time, I did not like it overall; shocking that one of the first RPGs from the 1980’s would have bad game design choices.

One thing I did like, eventually, was one of the ways it handled magic. For those that have not played FF1, in that game you have a limited number of slots to learn magic with. Once you have filled up the slots for one level of magic, you can’t learn any more. This means that your mage characters are specialized, the magic they know matters.

In many games where mages can learn everything, your mages don’t matter as individuals. One mage can be switched for another, and your preference then boils down to if you like their character or not within the story. I want to make it much harder for you to decide which characters you want to use in battle; sorry.

So, on top of all of the other systems that limit what each character can learn skill/magic wise, there will also be a limited number of spells that you can have equipped from your repertoire at any one time. The number of spells will increase as you progress up through the class types and, like your learned magic, the slots you have unlocked are tied to your character and not the classes.

This means that you have choices you will need to make before heading out on a quest. Do you think that you’re over-leveled for the quest and don’t need healing magic? Well, build out your mages with only attack magic. About to fight a boss? Might want to revise your spells.

One thing I have not nailed down yet is whether you will be able to change your spells on the fly or if you will need to go to a specific NPC to do it. I am leaning towards the former just because the limitation makes no sense. If you know something, you should be able to swap it in at any point.

This system makes your magic a tactical choice. You need to determine what spells you think you will need based on what you know about the area you are in. If you have enemies that are weak to wind, for example, grabbing some Pho spells would probably be a good idea.

These limitations do not apply to non-magic based skills; so things like Primaris Jumps and their related sub-skills are always available, even if you do not add the required magic spell to your character’s magic load out.

Speaking of load outs, segway.


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Options, we need options!
So, the first problem I anticipated people being frustrated over with the above system was going to be something along the lines of “But selecting all of my magic takes so long” once they got to a certain point in the game and had lots of stuff unlocked.

I also have faced similar instances myself in games I otherwise loved that got me a bit mad. It seems like this should be a simple leap of logic right? Well, the player can select things they use, we should give them a way to set up a preset of those things to make it quicker.

However, this leap of logic seems to be a leap too far for so many game developers it’s, frankly, embarrassing. The only game I have seen do this recently was Monster Hunter World. What am I talking about?

Load outs!

In Legend of Emilar, as a magic using class, you will gain access to an item that allows you to set up magic load outs. I am still working on how this mechanic/item is going to be introduced, if it will be something you unlock based on a quest, if you just have it, or what have you.

Basically, it works like this; at the start you get access to three load outs. The load outs allow you to select the magic you want to equip to your character. The number of spells you can select will change depending on how much magic you can equip to your character. So, as you gain more slots, you will unlock more slots in your load outs.

From the magic selection menu, you can choose to either manually select magic to swap out or you can choose to use a load out to change all your magic at once.

A massive quality-of-life upgrade.

As you progress through the game, you will be able to unlock more load out slots using Magicrystals to upgrade this item. This is one of the reasons I am not sure how I want to implement this mechanic story-wise yet, because if it is an item then each character needs one and since you can upgrade it, it would need to be tracked per character. If it is just a mechanic you always have access to, I could somehow implement it outside of the lore of the game so that it applies to all characters at once.

I like the later idea better because it is just easier for everyone. The only downside is that it wouldn’t be based within the lore, which is something I am trying to avoid; I want everything to have a reason for being and have a reasoning for how it functions grounded within the lore of the game. There may be a happy medium where skill loadouts are both not item related but can be tied to each character and be explained within the lore.

I will keep working on that.

So, there is this week done. This was a long one to write to be honest. Longer than I thought it would be. See everyone next week!

Posts

Pages: 1
Yo man! Been reading through these blogs. So many new details that I didn't know about from watching streams and such in these.

This is some really cool shit. I have some questions though, I will post em on the blogs they relate to.

Item Crafting:
So if I understand correctly, crafting items is a multi-step process like in other games. Each item you can craft can have items that need to be crafted themselves or be a mix of those and what you called "base materials" that aren't crafted.

The amount of items needed to craft are dependent on a character or NPC's crafting level, but for character's if their crafting level is lower than the crafting level of the item you will need to use more items.

After a certain level, natural bonuses can be added to items based on the type of that item being crafted. This happens with both characters and NPCs. But in addition you can manually add these bonuses using catalyst items once your skill level is high enough to use them.

The cost for NPC crafting is based on several formulas; first the cost is calculated based on the total cost of all of the base materials used to make the crafted item. Second is the 10% of the market value of the crafted item. Third is the service fee each NPC charges based on the total crafting cost.

All of these added together is the final cost to craft an item. NPC rates can vary based on their skill and the total crafting cost can change based on the number of crafted components you already have.

Did I get all of that right? It was a massive wall of text for that system and a lot of this is new information you haven't mentioned before.



The Magic School system is pretty much how you described it on stream, but the more detail on this Priaris Tree thing is interesting. So the "Primaris" tree is the base elemental tree for a school it sounds like?

I like that, for classes that mix a magic and non-magic class together, you are only allowing the use of the learned primary schools. That makes a lot of sense since a primary school is one that you can become a master in while the secondaries are ones you just know a bit about.

It makes your choices on the schools you learn much more impactful because you can choose something that may end up being worse off for certain objectives. I like that level of thoughtfulness in game play design.

One thing I noted that you said that is wayyy different than what you have said before now is the magic "upgrade" system? Wasn't this going to be a crafting system before? What happened there?
author=TrashCanEnthusiast
Yo man! Been reading through these blogs. So many new details that I didn't know about from watching streams and such in these.

This is some really cool shit. I have some questions though, I will post em on the blogs they relate to.

Item Crafting:
So if I understand correctly, crafting items is a multi-step process like in other games. Each item you can craft can have items that need to be crafted themselves or be a mix of those and what you called "base materials" that aren't crafted.

The amount of items needed to craft are dependent on a character or NPC's crafting level, but for character's if their crafting level is lower than the crafting level of the item you will need to use more items.

After a certain level, natural bonuses can be added to items based on the type of that item being crafted. This happens with both characters and NPCs. But in addition you can manually add these bonuses using catalyst items once your skill level is high enough to use them.

The cost for NPC crafting is based on several formulas; first the cost is calculated based on the total cost of all of the base materials used to make the crafted item. Second is the 10% of the market value of the crafted item. Third is the service fee each NPC charges based on the total crafting cost.

All of these added together is the final cost to craft an item. NPC rates can vary based on their skill and the total crafting cost can change based on the number of crafted components you already have.

Did I get all of that right? It was a massive wall of text for that system and a lot of this is new information you haven't mentioned before.



The Magic School system is pretty much how you described it on stream, but the more detail on this Priaris Tree thing is interesting. So the "Primaris" tree is the base elemental tree for a school it sounds like?

I like that, for classes that mix a magic and non-magic class together, you are only allowing the use of the learned primary schools. That makes a lot of sense since a primary school is one that you can become a master in while the secondaries are ones you just know a bit about.

It makes your choices on the schools you learn much more impactful because you can choose something that may end up being worse off for certain objectives. I like that level of thoughtfulness in game play design.

One thing I noted that you said that is wayyy different than what you have said before now is the magic "upgrade" system? Wasn't this going to be a crafting system before? What happened there?


Yep, you got the gist of most of it. It is a very complex system so I tried to break it down small enough to make sense in this blog post format without having anything visual from the game to accompany it.

As for the Primaris tress, exactly correct. Those are the base elemental trees.

Ah, the magic crafting plugin. So, yep that has been axed for my game; I am still releasing it as a plugin though. Instead what I will be implementing is the magic upgrade system to allow you to improve the magic you know.

With all of the other stuff going on with the magic system and how classes and such are shaking out, the crafting system just didn't make sense any longer for my game. It's too big, the magic crafting plugin could potentially handle it, but game mechanics wise it would just be too sloppy to maintain over 28 characters and dozens of classes that would be able to use magic.
author=LMPGames
Yep, you got the gist of most of it. It is a very complex system so I tried to break it down small enough to make sense in this blog post format without having anything visual from the game to accompany it.


Cool, it took a few times to get all that info straight, but it wasn't a huge problem. Like you said, that's a lot of hard code mechanics you went through.


author=LMPGames
As for the Primaris tress, exactly correct. Those are the base elemental trees.

I love this idea, this is the first time I have heard you mention it.


author=LMPGames
Ah, the magic crafting plugin. So, yep that has been axed for my game; I am still releasing it as a plugin though. Instead what I will be implementing is the magic upgrade system to allow you to improve the magic you know.

With all of the other stuff going on with the magic system and how classes and such are shaking out, the crafting system just didn't make sense any longer for my game. It's too big, the magic crafting plugin could potentially handle it, but game mechanics wise it would just be too sloppy to maintain over 28 characters and dozens of classes that would be able to use magic.


I like when a game dev can take an objective look at something they have put a lot of time into and say "this isn't worth it" and not try to force something into a game that won't fit. I do like the new idea to replace this system though and yeah it makes sense the reasoning why you're kicking the magic crafting system to the curb.

Once again, this is why I think this game is going to be incredible. You, as a game dev, have a realistic view on development. If something simply can't work, you look for way to modify the idea or keep the idea in spirit, but with an entirely different system. Or you just kill it entirely.

Too many devs get attached to large, complex systems and have a hard time dealing with them if they just aren't working. You don't and it is always refreshing to see when you let that side out.
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