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"It's a sobering thought, isn't it? To be able to look out your window and see the end of the world."

The world is on the verge of being consumed by the Fog, an ever-growing mist that corrupts and destroys all life within it. Unable to reach the source, humanity has no way to stop the Fog's growth. The destruction of the world is inevitable; humanity is at the end of its time.

In Asala, one of the few remaining settlements outside the Fog, two friends are on the verge of completing their training to become knights sworn to help weather the coming disaster: the cynical Aeyr Wilder and the kindhearted Mia Alacruz. However, catastrophic events soon destroy the very foundations of their lives, and they are forced to make the choice between their precious friendship and following the path they each believe is right. Their faith in their beliefs, and in each other, will be pushed to the limit as they decide what to save and what to sacrifice as the world collapses around them.

"There is no stopping the coming apocalypse. The only question remaining is: can humanity endure it?"


Prayer of the Faithless integrates elements of classic survival-horror games into its turn-based battle system. There are no readily accessible healing abilities, so your survival depends on managing a limited supply of restorative items you find or purchase. In addition, your equipped weapons and armor will drastically affect your performance by raising some stats, penalizing others, and changing your available abilities.

To reward a playstyle of controlled aggression rather than raw power and high levels, the battle system in Prayer of the Faithless turns a number of RPG conventions on their heads: You have three actions per turn, and you can spend them however you wish during battle. Plus, allies and enemies cannot guard, but must maintain their Stamina pools to block incoming damage. You must damage the enemy's Stamina to be able to hurt them, but be careful: overusing powerful abilities will leave allies wide open to attack!

Each ally's personality traits affect their combat prowess and abilities. As the story goes on and the stakes are raised, these traits will develop (and degrade!) along with the character's mental state. You will get to truly understand how each character thinks and feels through conversations and battle performance, and see how the state of the world affects their morale and beliefs.

Latest Blog

Thoughts on Game Endings

I've never exactly kept it a secret that Prayer of the Faithless was set just before the inevitable end of the world. Because of that, I knew that handling the multiple ways the story can conclude was going to be an uphill battle from the very beginning. After all, how else can you end a story with such a definitive finale already ingrained into its core premise? Last week, when I released chapter 4 to testers and began polishing the endgame, I found myself thinking about this a lot more.




Fair warning: While I'm obviously not going to mention anything specific about the CONTENTS of PotF's endings, I will be talking a little about my approach to designing endings, using references that COULD be taken as indirect spoilers. If you wish to go into PotF completely blind, this is not the blog for you. Turn back now.

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.....You still here? Okay, then.


First of all, I'd like to make a very clear distinction on what PotF actually is and, more importantly, what it is NOT. Prayer of the Faithless is not a story ABOUT the end of the world; it is a character-driven story that INVOLVES the end of the world. If the game really was ABOUT the end of the world, then I likely would have been done in a single month. Because the focus is on the people in the world rather than the world itself, that opens up more possible directions to take the story.

But, no matter how many options there are, the story has to end somehow. And that is where my struggles currently lie.


When designing the endings for PotF, I fell back on a few rules I try to adhere to for character-driven game stories:

1: Every ending is canon
You may be familiar with the concepts of the "bad," "normal," and "true" endings in a game. The idea that not completing certain objectives could lead to an unsatisfying ending or that fulfilling certain objectives would lead to the complete, canon ending. I totally understand the intent behind designing endings this way, and I don't begrudge their inclusion.

However, they do not exist in Prayer of the Faithless. There is no one "true" ending, nor is there an ending that punishes players if they missed a vital component earlier in the game. However the characters decide to complete their objectives, each ending should be just as conclusive and fulfilling as each other.


2: Ending titles
Anyone ever play Silent Hill 2? I could probably devote an entire blog post discussing why I adore the way it handles endings. For the purposes of this blog, though, I just want to bring up the names of each main ending: Leave, Maria, and In Water. For those who haven't played Silent Hill 2 (and if you have, pretend you haven't for a second), can you at least attempt an explanation as to what each ending could possibly mean? I doubt you would be able to do so. But what if I renamed the three endings to "Guilt," "Acceptance," and "Selfish?" Do you think you have a better grasp of what each ending represents now?

On the surface, it may look like a simple name change. However, I like to think that the names are vague to allow for the inclusion of multiple meanings/spins on the central theme. PotF's endings will function the same way. Each ending should encompass the central theme of what it's going for without being so specific that it runs the risk of diluting each individual experience and interpretation of the game. Plus, there's the benefit of being able to mention the endings without spoiling anyone still going through the game!


3: Scrap the End-O-Tron 3000



One of the most infuriating ways I've seen games determine endings is, right before the end credits, presenting players with a choice of what kind of ending they want. Players pick an option, see the ending, and that's it. Done.

I can kinda see that working in, say, a game without a predefined main character like Elder Scrolls, since a blank slate character with no predefined personality would benefit from having options to let players roleplay as to what they would want. However, more often than not it looks to me like a time/budget constraint. If that's the case, then fair enough, but as a deliberate design choice, it just screams "cop-out" to me. So this method of determining endings will not be present in PotF.

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That's about all I can really talk about without delving into the contents of the PotF's endings themselves, so I'm going to end the blog here. What I want to really get across here is that writing these endings involve a LOT of references, cross-checking, and questioning as many "what if they..." scenarios as I can to make sure that each ending gets the time and respect it deserves. This is extremely exhausting for both my time and sanity, and at some point I'll have to step back and say "that's enough." Otherwise, this game will never be completed.

If players don't want to try for the other endings, then I want to send them off on a high note. For a game involving the end of the world, that's... a real challenge, to say the least.

Posts

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Red_Nova
The all around prick
7478
"Kiyoma" is derived from "kiyomemasu" which is Japanese for "purify"
Question: Why are Kiyoma called Kiyoma?

IRL I mean. Like, "What does Kiyoma mean in Japanese".
I managed to get my stream up! Anyone who wants to join me mashing buttons is welcome!
Of course, I'll be streaming PotF! Details are there! (also excuse that annoying 15 seconds delay)

https://www.twitch.tv/silviutm

Have fun! (please tell me if the video buffers or if there is something wrong with audio)
Kloe
I lost my arms in a tragic chibi accident
1594
OMG IT'S ALL SHAKING AAAAAAAAHHHH
Red_Nova
The all around prick
7478
I'm not entirely sure what your question is. Yes, you have the literal definition of the word apocalypse right, but I used it primarily to refer to the catastrophic-level destruction of the world.

As for the title, well, there are a few reasons why it was chosen. What each player believes when they read the word faith and how it relates to them praying will be different, but not necessarily wrong. Note the word faith used in the description. That's just one meaning. It could be religious faith, faith in humanity, a brighter future, or even in one's self. Maybe it's all of these, maybe none.

Whatever definition you believe, though, this is a story about people who do not have that faith but want to find it.

Apologies for the evasive response, but I'd rather let the game show you than lay it out myself.
Hmmmm, I have a question, Red! Is this the literal meaning of Apocalypse?

'An apocalypse (Ancient Greek: ἀποκάλυψις apokálypsis, from ἀπό and καλύπτω, literally meaning "an uncovering") is a disclosure of knowledge or revelation. In religious contexts it is usually a disclosure of something hidden, “a vision of heavenly secrets that can make sense of earthly realities".'

.....And this game is called prayer of the faithless...

....

I think I'm on to something.... Maybe there's a revelation about monsters and what they really are coming up?
And the last bit's up! And, shortly, will be under the Grub's Playthrough media tab. In the meantime:

https://youtu.be/K6NiPcNA9Oo
Third part's out! When I figure out how to edit a media submission, I'll put 2/3 on mine.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKobFp-dn18
Red_Nova
The all around prick
7478
author=Crystalgate
Anyway, a question to Red_Nova. The description for Aeyr on the characters page states "Aside from that, his natural aggression enables him to manipulate the emotions of both enemies and allies to turn the tide of battle." However, I've noticed you've now given Amalie three emotion manipulating skills while Aeyr has none. Have you changed your mind regarding who gets what?


That was in the original plan, yeah, but that's certainly not the case anymore. I've removed the statement, so now it won't confuse anyone. Thanks for pointing it out.
I think Aeyr's ability comes later.

Also, Amalie and Aeyr have about even defense base. I simply don't think it's worth 2 actions to deal with Amalie provoking. *shrug*

Though, I don't know if she attains ALL aggression or just some. All might be useful IF abilities weren't practically 100% percent based and thus you can't just use her to let Aeyr unleash Sonic Fist/Pommel Strike and just never bother Focusing.

I think it might be better to make skills differ based on equipment you wear, with, for instance higher level gauntlets that improve the damage% of sonic fist but also cost more, improving the level scaling and giving you the choice of preserving SP or dealing heavier damage(along with the normal tradeoff of heavier gear costing more max sp)
author=hector212121
Eh, i guess it would have been handy when I had Mai, but i just didn't think of it. Action economy is key; if you can kill 1 enemy with 1 action rather than redirect 2 enemy's aggression with that action, i consider it better spent.

I haven't played the last version yet, but in all other versions I've played, Provoke was handy for almost every battle Amalie was in. It may be less useful to you though since you use completely different tactics than I do. Still, try using it and then have Amalie focus so she has her highest defense.

Anyway, a question to Red_Nova. The description for Aeyr on the characters page states "Aside from that, his natural aggression enables him to manipulate the emotions of both enemies and allies to turn the tide of battle." However, I've noticed you've now given Amalie three emotion manipulating skills while Aeyr has none. Have you changed your mind regarding who gets what?
Ah. I was worried there was some sort of secret or something i should worry about haha.
Red_Nova
The all around prick
7478
The main game has three endings. There are no alternate endings in the prologue.
Wait. The wiki page says the game has three endings. Does that....refer to the prologue, or the actual game proper? And if the former....how does one get different ones?
Eh, i guess it would have been handy when I had Mai, but i just didn't think of it. Action economy is key; if you can kill 1 enemy with 1 action rather than redirect 2 enemy's aggression with that action, i consider it better spent.

I'll go ahead and tell you that when I met ol' Bat-Wings for the second time, I flipped my shit. Then I flipped it again when the actual kill took place.
Yes, I would have loved to hear the story behind your hatred towards the provoke skill. Joke aside, that skill is one of the most useful, if not the most useful, in this game. You're making the game much harder by not using it.
Red_Nova
The all around prick
7478
Thanks for the LP! I'm kinda sad that I couldn't hear your running thoughts, but there was a lot I learned from watching you play.
That's right, I didn't keep in mind that you're doing a blind let's play.
author=Crystalgate
Can't you edit in your commentary afterwards? Post commentary is fairly common in Let's Plays after all.


I just....don't do that. :/ it doesn't seem quite right to me. You can't be surprised in post or anything like that.....

Anyhow! Part 2 is up! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y07RbDLKQp0&ab_channel=Grub
Can't you edit in your commentary afterwards? Post commentary is fairly common in Let's Plays after all.
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