STATUS

Is there life after finishing a game?

Posts

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LockeZ
I'd really like to get rid of LockeZ. His play style is way too unpredictable. He's always like this too. If he ran a country, he'd just kill and imprison people at random until crime stopped.
5236
This status sounds like the title of an isekai anime.
unity
You're magical to me.
12135
A few days of pride, happiness, and a sense of accomplishment.

Then you have to make a new game.
This is something that honestly terrifies me. It's no exaggeration to say it's the only thing motivating me and keeping me alive. What if, after doing absolutely everything within my power, I still fail completely and totally? That all my efforts haven't even helped a single person? So long as I'm still working on it, I at least have some sort of flimsy excuse to hide behind. That nobody cares, that it's no good because it isn't done yet.
unity
You're magical to me.
12135
author=Acra
This is something that honestly terrifies me. It's no exaggeration to say it's the only thing motivating me and keeping me alive. What if, after doing absolutely everything within my power, I still fail completely and totally? That all my efforts haven't even helped a single person? So long as I'm still working on it, I at least have some sort of flimsy excuse to hide behind. That nobody cares, that it's no good because it isn't done yet.

Yeah, I can completely understand. If you've spent weeks, months, or years on something, the prospect of it not making a big splash is pretty scary. So much of our self-worth can be tied up in these things. Amount of effort spent does not translate directly into quality, and quality doesn't even translate directly into popularity a lot of the time, so a lot of how well-received our games are after release feels like its out of our control to a degree no matter what.

When I was 14, I spent a whole year making a game in RPG Maker 2000. It was the first project I ever finished. I only shared the finished game with close friends, and none of them really liked it, and none of them finished it. I was devastated. I never had the guts to put the game online because if even the people closest to me didn't like it, what worth could it possibly have?

But maybe that helped me in the long run. Because, I didn't want to stop, I wanted to make more, and make something people would enjoy playing. While I can't separate completely from the project I'm working on, my mind is always on "what's next, after this game?" I don't get too hung up on any one project being perfect, and always tell myself "lessons learned on this project can always be used in the future" and "the goal is to get this game done and released."

And if a game receives very little attention, it's always hard, and it always hurts. But because I'm always looking forward to whatever's next, it allows me to keep going. "This one didn't do well, but I've learned, and next time, maybe things will be different."

It may be an oddball way to look at it all, probably pretty flawed for placing expectations on future me, but weirdly, it kinda works for me XD;
You guys know exactly what I mean, and I feel validated.

I'm still on the "will anyone care?" moment, and it's too soon to make anything out of it.

But it also feels too soo to start thinking of other games, so I feel like I should make a pause in gamemaking (as I'm coming out of a 7 year pause) and focus my life on other things. But I left everything behind to focus on gammaking, so I don't know how to do anything else anymore.

I mean, I'm living my life normally (within pandemic restrictions), but I lack that kind of motivation you only get when dedicating yourself to a big project.
Marrend
Guardian of the Description Thread
18937
It's not a great feeling when you're the dev, and only person posting on a gamepage. To put untold hours of work into a project, only for the various releases of it to be met with silence. Though, I recognize that it's just that my games have been more about technical aspects lately, and just get buried by the prettier-looking games.

Still, the "will anybody care?" moments are sometimes thwarted with the desire to see the game done regardless of how many people come to play it. To be able to say, "Here is this cool thing I did". Look at Okiku, Star Apprentice, and it's Wand of Blasting! How about Myraid Cypher, and it's trading mechanics? That Baclyea Revolution had all kinds of crazy-stupid things that I did to it make it the Suikoden tribute that it is! Arcomage Ace is pretty much Arcomage made with VX Ace!
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
24456
ANOTHER!
(Smashes empty mug of gammak on the floor.)
If you never finish a game then you never have to worry about this.
If you enjoy the process of creating a game, it doesn't matter if it's never finished. No one will love or be dedicated to your game like you. What is important is to never give up on it. That's like tossing away a piece of your soul. Love it for the journey, not the destination.
Can't worry about what happens after you're done making your game if you don't finish it.
zDS
Besr Richard Slayer
5044
finishing a game and releasing for me is like purposely drowning myself in a pool of anxiety

the pain slowly fades and you're like

dammit I need to make this next game now

repeat
Marrend
Guardian of the Description Thread
18937
Well, I dunno about life after finishing a game. But, there is definitely life after finishing the inevitable fishing mini-game!
Right now I'm torn between "I just released this game and barely anyone played it, I wonder if it was worth the energy, maybe I should invest so much in games anymore" and "nothing makes sense in life except for making games".

I think I need to so some sould searching and restructure my motivation to make games to something less dependent on massive external feedback.

author=Jpratt
If you enjoy the process of creating a game, it doesn't matter if it's never finished. No one will love or be dedicated to your game like you. What is important is to never give up on it. That's like tossing away a piece of your soul. Love it for the journey, not the destination.


And yet I'm very far from that. I don't think I could ever NOT worry about whether someone will play my game or not. I do enjoy the process of making games... not all the time... but mostly because while I'm making it, I'm creating expectations on how people will react to each element.
zDS
Besr Richard Slayer
5044
I'm the same as calunio. I personally love making games despite it being hard mentally at times. But if no one ever played them it'd just feel lonely. I want to impact people.
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