THE IMPORTANCE OF MUSIC IN A GAME

Posts

post=101041
That's correct. But that's okay, most movie soundtracks are not original compositions. Look at the Garden State soundtrack, for example. On the other hand, there are movies with awesome original soundtracks, like Conan The Barbarian and Edward Scissorhands.

That's not quite true. I'd say most movies have original soundtracks (and many movies also have a couple of licensed songs). Sure there are some exceptions. Such as Tarantino and possibly Garden State. (Tarantino used original music for the first time in Kill Bill. I don't know if Garden State included any original music since IMDB is slow on loading for me at the moment... Alright now it loaded and it has a credit "Original music by: Chad Fischer" so I assume Garden State included original music after all)
post=101033
I just want to say that the track Underneath the Rotting Pizza was the single piece of the puzzle that made the Slums in FF7 one of the most memorable video game settings I have ever played.


Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.

Also, truth be told I'm not sure if I would love Persona 2 as much as I do if the music wasn't so hot. And the scariest part about the Silent Hill games is the fact that the music gets louder and heavier whenever you're close to figuring out something. Music can add a hell of a lot to a game.

I would play a game if it was fun but had unimpressive music choice.

I might stop playing a game if it was fun but had AWFUL music choice.

I would immediately stop playing a game that wasn't fun, no matter how good the music is.
Craze
i bet she's a diva with a potion popping problem
14360
I'm with Drakonais - I'm not able to listen to other stuff when playing a game, even if it's slightly repetitive noise like in an RPG or WoW. It just doesn't work for me. As such, his points ring true in my case.

As for RM* games specifically, never use village people tracks -
post=101043
You are forgetting that they PAID FOR THE RIGHTS to use those tracks.


Oh, my mistake. I didn't think everybody was using licensed game makers and owned the rights to all of the resources in their game so they could legally sell it for money. I missed that memo.
Craze
i bet she's a diva with a potion popping problem
14360
post=101111
I actually imagine http://www.garyrog.50megs.com/midi/machoman.mid

would work rather well in a RM game.


Stop
harmonic
It's like toothpicks against a tank
4142
Music can really enhance the intended experience.

Epic battle with epic dragon should have epic music.
harmonic
It's like toothpicks against a tank
4142
Music can really enhance the intended experience.

Epic battle with epic dragon should have epic music.

EDIT: What the heck? I did not intend on posting this 3 times. Please delete
harmonic
It's like toothpicks against a tank
4142
Music can really enhance the intended experience.

Epic battle with epic dragon should have epic music.

EDIT: What the heck? I did not intend on posting this 3 times. Please delete
LouisCyphre
can't make a bad game if you don't finish any games
4523
post=101117
post=101043
You are forgetting that they PAID FOR THE RIGHTS to use those tracks.
Oh, my mistake. I didn't think everybody was using licensed game makers and owned the rights to all of the resources in their game so they could legally sell it for money. I missed that memo.


My 2k3 copy was purchased legally in Japanese and patched legally to English in accordance to my right as an end-user to modify it to meet my accessibility needs (in this case, language). All of my graphics and music are either open-license, created by my me, or created for that specific project and handed over.

Keep talking, please.
My 2k3 copy was purchased legally in Japanese and patched legally to English in accordance to my right as an end-user to modify it to meet my accessibility needs (in this case, language). All of my graphics and music are either open-license, created by my me, or created for that specific project and handed over.

It's a trap, or I'm giving this guy too much credit. I'll explain.

Oh, my mistake. I didn't think everybody was using licensed game makers and owned the rights to all of the resources in their game so they could legally sell it for money. I missed that memo.

How the hell did you even stretch this so far? I'll recap for everyone to ensure we're on the same page.

1- You mention it's exceedingly easy to have a good soundtrack

2 - Another person remarks that it takes effort to create a good soundtrack

3 - You proceed to reference how certain movies use licensed music in their films (Hint : Read the topic)

4 - Another poster notes that the creators paid for said licensing

5 - You - *somehow* link this to rpgmaking and the use of ripped media.

In summation : What the fuck?


As far as the actual topic is concerned, the most reasonable conclusion has already been reached. It would depend on the actual game itself. While most games use and benefit a great deal from having a good soundtrack, there are some other games that can do well with a limited or even no soundtrack. It depends greatly on the type of game you're making, regardless of genre.


Mala : I agree, it is strange. You must hate a hell of a lot of OSTs. The selection you posted is even more perplexing.
post=101039
post=101034
Music is only an enhancer. If Donkey Kong Country sucked it wouldn't matter that it had the good underwater ambient music.
I fail to see what you're trying to argue.

post=101090
...
I would immediately stop playing a game that wasn't fun, no matter how good the music is.

Now I really can't help you if you really don't get it this time.
post=101148
post=101039
post=101034
Music is only an enhancer. If Donkey Kong Country sucked it wouldn't matter that it had the good underwater ambient music.
I fail to see what you're trying to argue.
post=101090
...
I would immediately stop playing a game that wasn't fun, no matter how good the music is.


Now I really can't help you if you really don't get it this time.


I don't get it.
post=101145
How the hell did you even stretch this so far? I'll recap for everyone to ensure we're on the same page.

1- You mention it's exceedingly easy to have a good soundtrack

2 - Another person remarks that it takes effort to create a good soundtrack

3 - You proceed to reference how certain movies use licensed music in their films (Hint : Read the topic)

4 - Another poster notes that the creators paid for said licensing

5 - You - *somehow* link this to rpgmaking and the use of ripped media.

In summation : What the fuck?
It's easy to have a good soundtrack in your game using unlicensed music, which doesn't seem unscrupulous, at least for some users, who also use unlicensed RPG Makers and so on. It's a reasonable position, but everytime I tried to say anything, resistance was encountered. That's really not my fault.
It's easy to have a good soundtrack in your game using unlicensed music,


It's easy to just throw in a bunch of tracks you like. It's difficult to find the track necessary to fit both a scene, and your game's style.

but everytime I tried to say anything, resistance was encountered. That's really not my fault.


wat
So there are these games where you fly planes and shoot other planes (and ships and bunkers and AA and giant fuckoff guns). The final bosses of these games range from Megalith+TheNewYellows, SOLG+Grabarc+Ofnir, the Morgan, and the Chandelier. Here are their stories (shut up I know this isn't the final bosses topic):


Megalith is just one huge furball; a bunch of allied planes versus a bunch of enemy aces (who can eat up your allies for breakfast) before moving onto something made to destroy asteroids in space. Except it can't do anything to a plane and destroying it is just flying through some narrow corridors and shooting something. It isn't anything new or different, Shattered Skies was a better furball and Megalith is nothing but an obstacle course (Stonehenge at least could kill you (if you were an idiot (whoops!))) except it has music that you'd expect during the end of the fucking world. It is even Agnus Dei. It transforms what would be a mediocre level into the final throwdown of the game (along with the mass Mobius wing check in, that was
).


The SOLG stands better on its own: The Grabarc+Ofnir are old nemesis' from earlier in the game and they're back to end it (unlike say with the NewYellows, since Yellow 13 (the nemesis) was killed in the pre-Megalith mission and the NewYellows are just new f-aces). The SOLG is a nuclear attack satellite that you have to take out, except the prevoius mission was all about disarming the SOLG so it couldn't launch any nuclear attacks with a huge allied strike force including former enemies, your presumed dead mentor, SkyEye(!), and another narrow flying segment mission. Mission succeeds and now the enemy can't use their super weapon so they're stuck trying to stick it to you by dropping it on your nation's capital city and you have to take out the SOLG before it crashes. At this point the story is over; the president is rescued, the war is over, the real enemy has been revealed, all plot threads resolved, ect. and all that's left is the Grbarc, the Ofnir, and the SOLG. Taking out your old enemies is a short aerial skirmish and the SOLG's only attack against you is time and the debris that flies off as you slowly take it apart. Gameplay wise, nothing special but along with the plot's resolution the music is amazing in every way. It isn't just about being a huge throwdown, it's the end of the road, you've won. You're blowing up a nuclear attack satellite over the skies of the capital (pretend this isn't a problem). Top notch music here that really helps make this mission memoriable even if the actual stage isn't anything amazing.


The Morgan is my favorite last boss (and I'll probably get a bit nerd-spergin' here). The entire game has been about you and your wingman fighting enemy ace squads. They have fancy planes, their own color scheme, and they are far harder than any other aces in the prevous games (oh wow decent AI!). Then at the end game destroying doomplanes, betrayal, winning a war, and yet another narrow flying segment there is only one enemy left, the enemy top ace in the most cheaty plane ever: The Morgan. It is the greatest Ace fight in the game. One on one, the enemy is a bitch to hit, and you got ten minutes to take it out before it launches this game's super duper weapon. All of this is happening with Zero playing in the background with spanish guitars playing to the game's main theme like a waltz of aces as you try and shoot down your former wingman. It took me about two hours to shoot down The Morgan and you have, at most, ten minutes to do it and one of the things that kept me coming back to get shot down again was this beautiful music that never got old no matter how fustrated I got. The Morgan is my favorite last boss and the music is a major reason why.


Then there's the Chandelier. You'd think it would be epic; its a gigantic gun shooting the city 90% of the game has been about liberating defended by a mess of ground AA and a few aces (and ships but they are in their own little corner). It has the obligatory narrow flying segment, wingman goes down, basically everything that would make it at least a cool fight. Except it is to the most boring music imaginable for this kind of situation. It is what you'd expect to play during A Fistful of Explosions or some shit like that. It's a complete downer after how fucking epic Megalith, SOLG, and the Morgan's themes were.


tl;dr I've got a hard on for the PS2 Ace Combat final boss themes. They were an integral part in making those fights as amazing as they are. Ace Combat 6 can eat shit because it has such a shitty final boss theme
As previously stated, it would depend on the genre/type of game. If it is a horror game, silence may be golden. Though, if it is any other form of game that requires music, it is important to choose the right type for the atmosphere of a game. If it is a colourful and cheerful game, use some cheerful and vibrant music, to create an 'up-beat' reaction in the player. If it is a dark game, use some dark and hollow ambience.
It is also essential that you choose the right type of music for any specific scene happening in the game. If it is the last encounter, use a fast-paced composition (along with the fact that you are THE ONLY HOPE TO SAVING THE EARTH), to create a sense of hope and raise the player's heart-rate. If it is in a mountain, use a piece that is up-lifting and out-there (I'm not sure how to explain this. Think of the music used in Final Fantasy 6 when you first gain access to the Blackjack airship. The use of echoes to create a sense of a wide world/limitless space around you).
post=101148
post=101039
post=101034
Music is only an enhancer. If Donkey Kong Country sucked it wouldn't matter that it had the good underwater ambient music.
I fail to see what you're trying to argue.
post=101090
...
I would immediately stop playing a game that wasn't fun, no matter how good the music is.


Now I really can't help you if you really don't get it this time.


So where's the argument? You sound like you're disagreeing with me but you're not.
Oh, I wasn't arguing. I was just commenting that all the good music goes to waste if the game is bad. I quoted the donkey kong country post because I wanted to say stuff about the other tracks in the game at the same time.


PS:
Swatter Demon for the win.