WHAT ARE YOU IN THIS FOR?

Posts

Max McGee
with sorrow down past the fence
9219
Secondly, I decided to come back here for my CV also. Having a game, even only on RPG Maker, that you designed yourself and that ends up being well designed is a great line in your CV when you're starting from nothing and you want to work in the industry.


Note that it is a huge black mark AGAINST you when applying for a job in any other industry, so make sure and remove it if you happen to do that. Most serious business people really have negative associations with "games".
author=Max McGee
Note that it is a huge black mark AGAINST you when applying for a job in any other industry, so make sure and remove it if you happen to do that. Most serious business people really have negative associations with "games".

This is starting to change. We are taking over the workforce.
Viva la revolution!

On an anecdotal note, a friend of a friend put "World of Warcraft" in his Interests on his resume. He and the interviewer hit it off, and yes, he got the job. I forget what it was exactly, but it was nothing big.
No longer do you have to rebuild NASCAR engines in your garage or have traveled to three different continents to be an interesting person. Viva la revolution!
Lol, hard to believe that you can use these RM games as part of your resume for your next job finding...same thing as being a forum moderator, too...

"Yeah, Mr. Boss Man, I am the creator of the ANIUMONOPOLOUS! It's a rather popular porn / anime remake of a board game that was originally made by a couple of dudes -- and I did all the coding for them! Give me a job with your fucking company, now!" Lol.
author=Brent
Lol, hard to believe that you can use these RM games as part of your resume for your next job finding...same thing as being a forum moderator, too...

"Yeah, Mr. Boss Man, I am the creator of the ANIUMONOPOLOUS! It's a rather popular porn / anime remake of a board game that was originally made by a couple of dudes -- and I did all the coding for them! Give me a job with your fucking company, now!" Lol.


Well here in Quebec province we do have programs for videogames in university and it's specificed an RPG Maker or other equivalent software decent-lenght game is applicable for the portfolio that will get you in the program. Same for requirements of some studios here in Montreal. Videogames jobs are not that unreachable here in Quebec.
Ark
Wario's-a number one!
1770
author=Dyhalto
author=Max McGee
Note that it is a huge black mark AGAINST you when applying for a job in any other industry, so make sure and remove it if you happen to do that. Most serious business people really have negative associations with "games".
This is starting to change. We are taking over the workforce.
Viva la revolution!

On an anecdotal note, a friend of a friend put "World of Warcraft" in his Interests on his resume. He and the interviewer hit it off, and yes, he got the job. I forget what it was exactly, but it was nothing big.
No longer do you have to rebuild NASCAR engines in your garage or have traveled to three different continents to be an interesting person. Viva la revolution!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA Nascar isn't even considered a sport anymore.

I'm in this for my IRC friends. I FIGHT FOR MY FRIENDS
Dudesoft
always a dudesoft, never a soft dude.
6309
nascar is a rich man's watching paint dry.
kentona
Your mom is a hero
20851
Designing videogames is on my resume (under Interests). I was even asked about it and I explained to them what I do for my hobby. (also, reading, writing, and playing hockey are also on there)

I've gotten several jobs over the years with this on my resume.
author=kentona
Designing videogames is on my resume (under Interests). I was even asked about it and I explained to them what I do for my hobby. (also, reading, writing, and playing hockey are also on there)

I've gotten several jobs over the years with this on my resume.
Are you serious? What kind of jobs did you apply for?
Starscream
Conquest is made from the ashes of one's enemies.
6110
Slightly off-topic, but I know of several people who included RPG Maker / indie game development in their CV/portfolio that have been hired at companies like Turbine, Nexon, ArenaNet, etc. Not saying that it is a surefire path to success (it isn't), but it is possible!
A 'Hobby' section on a resume is increasingly valuable. While there is nothing more valuable than Experience, and nothing more impressive than Training, Hobbies can be seen as the deciding factor. When a university engineering course graduates, local firms are often flooded with resumes (For example, University of Waterloo has several engineering firms located nearby like RIM and SandVine.) The majority of these resumes have the same information on them:

Training
Graduated @ Waterloo University with a Bachelor's of Engineering

Experience
Worked @ xy Place for 1 Co-Op Term
Worked @ yz Place for 1 Co-Op Term
Worked @ xz place for 1 Co-Op Term
etc.

Those individual places might vary, but the work is usually not what is important.

Now, when you get to a hobbies section, you can really learn a lot more about a potential employee.

For example

Hobbies
Playing Video Games, Snowboarding, Playing Football, Reading, Studying Egyptian History

vs

Hobbies
Designing Video Games, Biking/Exercise, Reading, Writing, Finding and Exploiting Security Loopholes (lol lulzsec), Carpentry and Home Renovation

the second example is taken directly from a friend's resume

When an employer sees the first, he sees that your interests aren't in the field. Sure, you play video games and have all the required training; but your interests are elsewhere and you likely won't find the job rewarding or feel the need to go above and beyond what you are expected to do.

When an employer sees the second, he can tell that you are likely a more mature person, are applying what you've learned in school on a regular basis, and have some knowledge/experience in other areas of the world.



Neither of these is going to make the difference between you getting the job and not getting the job if you're applying for white collar work like a gas station or a grocery store, but in highly competitive fields it makes the difference.
Dudesoft
always a dudesoft, never a soft dude.
6309
It's also a conversation piece. Maybe an ice breaker to relieve tension, I've found. I wouldn't put anything on there incriminating like lulsecs though.
author=prexus
Neither of these is going to make the difference between you getting the job and not getting the job if you're applying for white collar work like a gas station or a grocery store, but in highly competitive fields it makes the difference.

"White collar" is you guys. Office/cubicle stuff.
"Blue collar" is the sweaty brow stuff. Manual labor, from unskilled shelf stocking to skilled stone masonry.
Yeah I got them backwards.

But what makes you think i'm White Collar? :P

I was recently a Turf Management Specialist and am now looking for work as a Mechanic :P
chana
(Socrates would certainly not contadict me!)
1584
"Designing Video Games" : yeah, but when you write that (in the hypothesis where the employer is interested), make sure you have something really professional, or close to, to show!
My ultimate end goal is to get my ideas making enough money for me to live comfortably on. I don't care if it becomes a big media conglomerate or if it's just me writing my books and publishing them, and then leasing the various franchise licenses... as long as I get some say in how the game's aesthetic looks and feels.
kentona
Your mom is a hero
20851
author=supremewarrior
author=kentona
Designing videogames is on my resume (under Interests). I was even asked about it and I explained to them what I do for my hobby. (also, reading, writing, and playing hockey are also on there)

I've gotten several jobs over the years with this on my resume.
Are you serious? What kind of jobs did you apply for?
clerk at a grocery store (ie- stockboy)
programmer/analyst in the grocery industry
software developer in health care
technical analyst/systems integrator in health care


author=prexus
Neither of these is going to make the difference between you getting the job and not getting the job if you're applying for white collar work like a gas station or a grocery store, but in highly competitive fields it makes the difference.
heh.
LockeZ
I'd really like to get rid of LockeZ. His play style is way too unpredictable. He's always like this too. If he ran a country, he'd just kill and imprison people at random until crime stopped.
6138
While I don't have my RPG Maker game on my resume, I do have my MUD (the online game I help run) on my resume and have gotten employers very interested in it during interviews. It single-handedly got me a job as a database programmer at a baptist seminary(!), and was considered very impressive at two other job interviews, both for computer repair. One of which I got, the other I didn't get but they still appreciated it. A movie/game rental store apparently liked it too, enough to escalate me to the second level of interviews, but not enough to overcome the fact that I don't know anything about movies or actors (they actually quizzed me during the interview).

Apparently, the ability to start and complete a major project which involves programming APIs, adding code to existing software made by programmers who no longer are around to ask for help, creative writing, working with a team of other programmers, and dealing with players (read: customers) on a daily basis all amounts to a serious show of both enthusiasm and experience.
Okay, I'll bite. :)


I've played console and PC RPGs all my life, and I've never gotten tired of them. From traditional games like Lufia, to revolutionary games like Persona, I love RPGs of all types. During my busy university days, I used a lot of PS2 RPGs to relax. I've always been fascinated with how they work, so I decided to try my hand at making one to call my own.

Like many of you, I tried at first to build one from scratch with programs like Game Maker and Game Studio, but quickly realized the huge amount of work involved with just putting together the engine by myself (there is a reason why some companies employ dozens of people to work on a single game after all). But, when I found RPG Maker, I realized it was exactly what I wanted the whole time. Now I make games that are essentially love letters to my obsession with RPGs.
gamedev

ensnared by its golden tendrils and swallowed whole into its rancid belly

have been trying to escape for years

where is the exit somebody please help