THE JAPANESE JUSTICE SYSTEM

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http://www.vox.com/world/2015/12/13/9989250/japan-crime-conviction-rate

This is a rare inside look into their justice system. It sounds like it can get pretty corrupt. I'm actually not a big fan of VOX, but sometimes they post something worthwhile.
You lied to me, Phoenix Wright.

You LIED.
Ratty524
The 524 is for 524 Stone Crabs
12652
Wow, that is pretty fucked up. Especially with how the judicial system uses scare-tactics to get something out of their suspects. It sounds more like a "guilty until proven innocent" system they've got there.

Every country has its cons, it seems.
Craze
i bet she's a diva with a potion popping problem
13234
Ratty524
Every country has its cons, it seems.


yes, this is why we have justice systems
pianotm
The TM is for Totally Magical.
21795
Craze
Ratty524
Every country has its cons, it seems.
yes, this is why we have justice systems


Badump tish!
Jeroen_Sol
This time... I will revive mafia for sure... GIVE MY CREATURE LIFE!
3945
author=SgtMettool
You lied to me, Phoenix Wright.

You LIED.

Not at all. This horrible justice system is why the Phoenix Wright franchise exists in the first place. Time and time again the series comments on how awful it is to be falsely accused of a crime in Japan. (The translations are set in America, of course, but that's beside the point.)

It's most obvious in the first game. Manfred von Karma is like the embodiment of the Japanese justice system. He doesn't give a shit about whether people are innocent, and just cares about having a perfect conviction rate. Also, he physically abuses people who try to defy him.
I don't really know the Japanese justice system. I probably shouldn't tell anyone this, but I heard that in Japan if a husband cheats on his wife, or if a wife cheats on her husband the family has the right to put him, or her too death. I think that's a little messed up, but I can't really judge them. I also heard that if someone gets caught stealing stuff in Japan they get ten years in prison with hard labor. However I did find some thing on crime in Japan. Here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Japan

According to the wiki article Japan has a low crime rate, because they ban weapons to the general public.
Pretty sure that's not true - the cheating thing.
The system over there's pretty harsh. If you're wondering about prisons, too, an Australian fellow living in Japan wrote a fascinating 10-part series about his time being arrested and having to get himself out of jail: http://www.stippy.com/japan-life/gaijin-in-a-japanese-prison-1/

Pretty interesting read, albeit a bit unnerving.
Max McGee
with sorrow down past the fence
9219
that article really was not much of an inside look
As somebody who has lived in japan for a couple of years, take my advice: Bribes are the way to go in Japan. Just pay your bribe and you will get off most crimes; The konban system creates a form of classism within the police force, and severely limits their chances of advancement and puts a solid limit on their respective salary. Just remember that they have a wife and kids, and that giving them a little spending money will always be appreciated.

That being said, it seems that this is more generally a moral problem rather then merely a curropt justice system. After all, ask anybody who lives in Saitama or Kanagawa in the rundown districts (Such as Kawaguchi or Kita Kurihama...), or even in south Osaka that the yaks(slang for yakuza in kansai) are better police then the actual state hired goons. Friendlier to foreigners who have adapted to the local culture as well.

And to top it off, this article does not even go into the legal juxtaposition in certain military "american" towns in Japan, such as Yokosuka or Gunma, where if you are not careful you will have to be dealing with local shore patrol MPs rather then Japanese police if you get into trouble. And that's if the JSDF form of MP does not manage to get ahold of you first (The JSDF does not have to put you through a court hearing. They can decide on the punishment from a higher ranking official for any civilian arrested, without the need of a trial.)

This article is a very shallow one, sadly enough. I wish people would focus more on fixing the corruption with the Land Development Buearu, which believes that funding casinos is essential "development" rather then fixing certain cities and cleaning them up.
author=faces
And to top it off, this article does not even go into the legal juxtaposition in certain military "american" towns in Japan, such as Yokosuka or Gunma, where if you are not careful you will have to be dealing with local shore patrol MPs rather then Japanese police if you get into trouble.

As someone who was originally slated for orders to Japan when I joined the Navy, yeah, this. If you're a tourist, specifically an American, and you get stopped by the police in Japan, you might be alright. Get into legal trouble and get stopped by an American Naval Master-at-Arms/police in Yokosuka, where they have legal jurisdiction though? Yeah, you're about to get bent with the book.
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